Tag Archives: NPR

Sep. 19, 2017 Plastic Seafood

On Sep. 19, 2017 NPR’s Ken Christensen reported “Guess What’s Showing Up In Our Shellfish? One Word: Plastics.” Vancouver Island University’s Sarah Dudas talked about the increasing amount of plastics in shellfish. She said “”So when you eat clams and oysters, you’re eating plastics as well,”

Peter Ross of the Vancouver Aquarium’s Ocean Pollution Research Program said “We’ve long known that plastic and debris can be a problem for ocean life,” “The research is adding to the evidence of a problem that touches every corner of the planet: from the depths of the ocean abyss to the surface waters of the Arctic to an area in the middle of the Pacific Ocean now known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. Scientists think plastic pollution in the ocean could outweigh the fish there by 2050.”

Copyright 2017 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Aug. 7, 2017 Google Women

On Aug. 7, 2017 Motherboard’s Louise Matsakis reported “Google Employee’s Anti-Diversity Manifesto Goes ‘Internally Viral” While the document itself contains the thoughts of just one Google employee (James Damore), the context in which they were shared—Google is currently being investigated by the Department of Labor for its gender pay gap and Silicon Valley has been repeatedly exposed as a place that discriminates against women and people of color—as well as the private and public response from its workforce are important.”

According to NPR’s Bill Chappell reporting in “Google Grapples With Fallout After Employee Slams Diversity Efforts”

  • Women make up 25 percent of the company’s leadership
  • Women hold 20 percent of technology jobs
  • Overall, 31 percent of Google’s employees are female
  • 56 percent of employees are white; 35 percent are Asian
  • 4 percent are Hispanic, 4 percent are mixed-race, and 2 percent are black

Google is not alone with this problem. The test for diversity is not reading public relations press releases, but direct observation. Walk into a company’s offices. How many women do you see? How many over forty in leadership? How many are making six figures? If it is not half the population, the company has some work to do. Start hiring women and pay them market rates.

Copyright 2017 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Aug. 4, 2017 Wage Increase Not Worth A Dime

On Aug. 4, 2017, NPR’s Scott Neuman reported “U.S. Economy Adds 209,000 Jobs In July; Unemployment Dips To 4.3 Percent” but “Average hourly wages rose by 9 cents, to $26.36.” In other words real wages have not gone up a dime. Having a job and having a job that helps pay the bills are two different things.

Copyright 2017 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Jul. 19, 2017 Climate Change Fewer People

On Jul. 19, 2017, NPR’s Tori Whitley reported “Want To Slow Global Warming? Researchers Look To Family Planning” A study by Kimberly Nicholas and others at Lund University in Sweden concluded one way to reduce CO2 gas emissions is to have fewer children. Having one fewer child (an average for developed countries of 58.6 metric ton CO2-equivalent (tCO2e) emission reductions per year.

On Aug. 19, 2017, NPR’s Jennifer Ludden reported “Should We Be Having Kids In The Age Of Climate Change?” Travis Rieder of James Madison University said 4 degrees of warming would be “largely uninhabitable for humans.””Here’s a provocative thought: Maybe we should protect our kids by not having them,” According to nonprofit Conceivable Future’s Meghan Kallman, “the climate crisis is a reproductive crisis.”

“Oregon State University researchers have calculated the savings from all kinds of conservation measures: driving a hybrid, driving less, recycling, using energy-efficient appliances, windows and light bulbs. For an American, the total metric tons of carbon dioxide saved by all of those measures over an entire lifetime of 80 years: 488. By contrast, the metric tons saved when a person chooses to have one fewer child: 9,441.”

Note to young people planning their future in Oregon.

Copyright 2017 DJ Cline.com All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Jul. 15, 2017 China Teleports Cryptography

On Jul. 15, 2017 NPR’s Tori Whitley reported “Beam Me Up, Scotty … Sort Of. Chinese Scientists ‘Teleport’ Photon To Space” “Chinese scientists have announced they successfully “teleported” information on a photon from Earth to space, spanning a distance of more than 300 miles.”

“There is a security issue here,” Brian Greene, professor of physics and mathematics at Columbia University says, “because the first country to build a quantum computer or a quantum Internet, they will be able to send effectively unhackable messages. And then they can use the technology to try to hack into more conventional messages.”

Great. Just great. Quantum spam.

Copyright 2017 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Jul. 12, 2017 Seattle Tax Rich

On Jul. 12, 2017 NPR’s Laurel Wamsley reported “‘Most Regressive’ State, Seattle Passes Tax On Highest Incomes”. “The council voted 9-0 in favor of the tax, which will apply a 2.25 percent tax on annual income over $250,000 on individuals, or $500,000 for couples filing jointly. The city estimates the tax will generate $140 million in new annual revenue.” Daniel Beekman of The Seattle Times reported  ” ‘Seattle should serve everyone, not just rich folks,’ software developer Carissa Knipe told the council before the 9-0 vote, saying she makes more than $170,000 per year.  ” ‘I would love to be taxed,’ the 24-year-old from Ballard testified, drawing applause from a room packed with supporters of the tax.”

Copyright 2017 DJ Cline All rights reserve.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Jul. 11, 2017 Telework Not Working?

On Jul. 11, 2017 NPR’s Yuki Noguchi reported “Some Employers Are Rethinking Telework, Citing A Need For Better Collaboration” about some companies like Bank of America, Best Buy, IBM,  Reddit and Yahoo making more employees work onsite. Many endorse the Agile work method, where employees are all crammed into the same room until they solve a problem. Despite this counter trend the movement is toward remote work because not all the talent works in the same building, town or country. Goody Group’s Jay Friedman said “Being remote forced us to document more — so document decisions, document learning, training, etc. — and that actually reduced the amount of time and back-and-forth,” keeping everyone on the same page and on task, Friedman says.”

Copyright 2017 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Jun. 5, 2017 Apple Homepod

On Jun. 5, 2017 NPR’s Alina Selyukh reported “Apple Joins Smart-Speaker Race With Music-Focused ‘HomePod'”. Apple’s Homepod enters the nosy home computer market with Amazon’s Echo/Alexa and Google’s Home and Microsoft’s Cortana. A real step forward will be when they get a computer than can pay for the house.

Copyright 2017 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Jun. 2, 2017 American Dream Hoarders

On Jun. 2, 2017 NPR’s Steve Inskeep reported “Top 20 Percent Of Americans ‘Hoard The American Dream.” Brookings Institution’s Richard Reeves new book called “Dream Hoarders.” says the top twenty percent richest Americans get the best homes, schools and jobs.

Reeves said “I’ve come to believe that the dangerous separation of the American upper-middle class from the rest of society is a huge problem for politics because there’s a sense of a bubble, there’s a sense of people who are kind of making out pretty well from current trends and who are increasingly separate – occupationally, residentially, educationally and economically — from the rest of society. They are also disproportionately powerful and the fact that they are not only separate but unaware of the degree to which the system works in their favor strikes me as one of the most dangerous political facts of our time.”

Copyright 2017 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

May 22, 2017 Trump Touches Orb

On May 22, 2017 NPR’s Colin Dwyer reported “Here’s The Deal With That Glowing Orb — And Plenty Of Notes On What It Isn’t.” American President Donald Trump, Saudi King Salman and Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi touched a glowing orb to start a welcome video at the Global Center for Combating Extremist Ideology in Riyadh. Nothing odd here. Just three guys touching an orb. Three grown men. Three world leaders.

Copyright 2017 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

May 18, 2017 Justice Dept. Names Robert Mueller Special Counsel

On May 18, 2017, CNN reported that Justice Department Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein named Mueller Special prosecutor,  “The Justice Department is appointing former FBI Director Robert Mueller as a special counsel to oversee the growing probe into Russian meddling in the 2016 election and possible ties to associates of President Trump.”

According to NPR’s Jessica Taylor “As special counsel, Mueller will have full authorization to direct the Russia investigation, including any links or coordination between the Russian government and individuals associated with Trump’s campaign and any other matters. He can only be fired by Rosenstein, only with cause, and with notice to Congress. He is authorized to prosecute federal crimes that may arise from the probe.”

Copyright 2017 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

May 10, 2017 Reporter Arrested Asking Questions

On May 10, 2017, NPR’s Camila Domonoske reported “West Virginia Reporter Arrested For Yelling Question At HHS Secretary.” On May 9, 2017, in a hallway of Charleston West Virginia Capitol building, Public News Service Dan Heyman asked Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price if insurance companies would treat domestic abuse as a pre-existing condition under the newly proposed bill before Congress. He was arrested and held under $5000 bail. “This is what I’m supposed to do,” Heyman said. “I am supposed to go and find out if somebody is going to be affected by this health care law.””At the time of his arrest, Heyman says, he identified himself as a journalist by wearing his press pass and a “Public News Service” shirt.”

On May 3, 2017, Time magazine’s Lisa Marie Zegarra reported “Jury Convicts Woman Who Laughed During Jeff Sessions’ Confirmation Hearing.” “Desiree A. Fairooz, a Code Pink protester, was removed from the Jan 10 hearing after she laughed when Sen. Richard Shelby (R-Ala.) stated that Sessions has an “extensive record of treating all Americans equally under the law.” The jury on Wednesday also found guilty her parading or demonstrating on Capitol grounds, according to the New York Times.”

An emperor with no clothes should have a thicker skin.

Copyright 2017 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Apr. 3, 2017 Self Driving Car Insurance

On Apr. 3, 2017 NPR’s Yuki Noguchi wrote “Self-Driving Cars Raise Questions About Who Carries Insurance” Every auto insurance company will be affected by self driving cars. “Billionaire investor Warren Buffett, whose company, Berkshire Hathaway, owns the insurance giant Geico, told CNBC in a February interview: “If the day comes when a significant portion of the cars on the road are autonomous, it will hurt Geico’s business very significantly.”

If current inequality trends continue, most people will be too poor to own a car.  If they need transportation they will use Uber or Lyft. They might use a traditional taxicab or car rental company that has survived the transition. Car manufacturers might even offer their cars directly. In any case, consumers will not be paying directly for insurance. If a car has an accident it will not be the passenger’s fault.

Copyright 2017 DJ Cline All Rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Mar. 24, 2017 Experience Discrimination

On Mar 24, 2017 NPR’s Ina Jaffe wrote “Too Much Experience To Be Hired? Some Older Americans Face Age Bias” about age discrimination. Prof. David Neumark of University of California, Irvine sent out 40,000 resumes with age as the only difference. The older the person the less likely they to be called back. Older women  were the most affected. One recruiter blew the whistle and went to San Francisco law firm Altshuler Berzon and the course is working its way to the US Supreme Court.

Copyright 2017 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Mar. 21, 2017 World Maps Change

On Mar. 21, 2017 NPR’s Colin Dwyer reported “Boston Students Get A Glimpse Of A Whole New World, With Different Maps” about replacing Mercator projection maps with Gall-Peters maps (see above). To understand why this is a big deal, I recommend Jerry Brotton’s book “A History of the World in 12 Maps.” It is the story of cartographers struggling for centuries to create accurate two dimensional representations of a three dimensional world. The results were distorted and biased. By the twenty-first century it was possible using digital devices to view satellite images making all earlier map projections obsolete.

I liked flipping through history maps made by Denoyer Gippert and Kinder and Hilgemann etc. It was enlightening to see empires appear with big sweeping arrows wiping out older empires only to replaced by somebody else. I was never happy with maps that made Siberia and Antarctica look huge. I did like maps that were centered  over a continent. They did not show the whole planet but I never expected it to. It has taken hundreds of years to show that it takes more than one map to describe a planet.

Copyright 2017 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Mar. 16, 2017 Robot Traffic Stop

On Mar. 16, 2017 NPR’s Vignesh Rakmachandran reported “When Policing And Race Cross Paths In Silicon Valley” about using robots to question suspects. What happens when a robot pulls over a self driving car?

“Duke University students Vaibhav Tadepalli and Chris Reyes developed a prototype robot that could someday conduct the initial phase of a traffic stop, possibly easing concerns for both drivers and police officers. With the press of a button, an officer can deploy the “Sentinel” robot from a patrol car that rides over to the stopped driver’s car, raises a screen and starts a two-way video conference between the driver and the police officer.”

Rather than use a Sentinel robot, why not use a flying drone? It could fly up to a car, signal for it to pull over and ask the driver for information. It could adjust to any height faster. If the car does not pull over, the drone could follow it faster than a ground drone or patrol car.

Copyright 2017 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Feb. 19, 2017 Blumbers

Outsourcing to India Threatened

On Feb. 14, 2017, NPR’s Julie McCarthy wrote “Indian IT Outsourcers Anxious Over Potential Changes To H1-B Visas” about legislation from the new administration possibly ending the H1B visa and green card programs. Stephen Yale-Loehr of Cornell University said that last year  “U.S. companies that sought to bring highly skilled workers to the U.S. filed 236,000 petitions that went into a lottery for just 85,000 H1-B visas, the legal cap.”

“One bill proposes more than doubling the minimum wage of H1-B holders, which by law is set at $60,000. Critics argue the H1-B has been misused to displace American workers, and that there has been an incentive to prefer Indian IT workers because they are cheaper.  Shailesh Chitnis, with the data mining and analysis company Compile, says that while the median salary for all H1-B holders is $71,000, most but not all Indian outsourcers pay below that. If they had to double salaries, Chitnis says, Indian IT companies would have to change their 20-year-old business model.” American companies may be forced to hire citizens at fairer market rates like $120,000.

“Shevendra Singh with India’s National Association of Software Services Companies, or NASSCOM, refutes allegations that Indian companies are dislocating American workers or supplying low-paid labor.”

Copyright 2017 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

May 13, 2008 SDF Teen Tech 2

SDForum copy.jpgagrawal-athias-copy.jpgalexander-deanna-copy.jpgbajarin-ben-copy.jpgbolwell-andrew-copy.jpgbraccia-andrew-copy.jpgbrackeen-debra-copy.jpgbrusilovsky-daniel-copy.jpgchoudhary-anirudh-copy.jpgdeglin-george-copy.jpgdonohue-stacy-copy.jpgescobedo-richard-copy.jpgfranusic-joel-copy.jpggibbs-mike-copy.jpggibbs-peggy-copy.jpgha-oanh-copy.jpghathi-sekal-copy.jpghoffman-steve-copy.jpgirwin-jeff-copy.jpgjoh-jae-copy.jpgkamrin-ameer-copy.jpgkapur-ravi-copy.jpgkarras-jeff-copy.jpgkazerooni-mazy-copy.jpgkobylarz-constance-copy.jpgkumar-shooby-copy.jpgleopoldtilley-allison-copy.jpglevide-cliff-copy.jpglevine-drew-copy.jpglevy-mitchell-copy.jpglewin-jd-copy.jpglibova-alina-copy.jpgliddle-daniel-copy.jpglindsay-jeff-copy.jpglodha-surahbi-copy.jpgmagid-larry-copy.jpgmonsalve-sergio-copy.jpgnoguchi-sharon-copy.jpgoishi-lindsay-copy.jpgolson-stephanie-copy.jpgosborn-jon-copy.jpgpande-mani-copy.jpgpelton-charles-copy.jpgpetersson-viktor-copy.jpgpriyanka-bhatia-copy.jpgrodhe-karen-copy.jpgsakai-john-copy.jpgsamar-anshul-copy.jpgsamar-vipin-copy.jpgshalavi-alex-copy.jpgsiebert-jeff-copy.jpgsmith-adam-copy.jpgsmith-whitney-copy.jpgstock-elizabeth-copy.jpgstrange-angela-copy.jpgthompson-matt-copy.jpgtruong-salina-copy.jpgvan-diggelen-alison-copy.jpgwilde-jonathan-copy.jpgwu-elaine-copy.jpg

On May 13, 2008 at HP in Palo Alto, SDForum held it’s second annual Teen Tech event. NPR, the San Jose Mercury News and CBS 60 Minutes covered this year’s bigger event.

One way to see the future is to meet the people who will be living in it. The Teen Tech event is a good way to see what the next fifty years will be like. Teens connect with each other while moving through physical and virtual space using voice, video, text messaging and games. Teens are moving beyond social networking to building businesses with each other. The question is not what technology teens will buy but what technology they will sell to the rest of us.

SDForum’s CEO Susan Lucas-Conwell and HP’s Debra Brackeen kicked off the event by introducing Anshul Samar of Alchemist Empire. Samar created a game where chemical elements and compounds become essentially action figures with particular properties. It has sold thousands of copies around the world.

Stephanie Olsen of Cnet moderated the High School panel with Deanna Alexander, Priyanka Bhatia, Sekal Hathi and Jonathan Wilde. Teens seldom watch TV but do watch YouTube. It would be nice to see a new episode on a big TV. They listen to music from iTunes and movies on Netflix and search for reviews on Google. They spend six hours a day on the laptops doing homework, reading and e-mailing because it can reach teachers, relatives or potential employers outside their age group. Students want teachers to create consistent user interfaces with lectures online and interactive whiteboards for online classes.

While they have no trouble learning new technical skills they still want to work on their real world social skills. Facebook is more popular and less complicated than MySpace. Most smart phones are not as smart as the iPhone. They want GPS, decent video and calendars interfaces that are easier to use. Like their parents, they are very concerned about privacy and safety. They are more likely to participate in causes online than their parents.

Allison Leopold Tilley of Pillsbury Winthrop moderated the second panel with Steve Hoffman of ROCKETON, JD Lewin of Microsoft, Matt Thompson of Sun, and Ameer Karim of HP. Millennials are so adept at new technology that their parents ask them for technical advice. They see teens more mobile, more virtual and more likely to use or develop open source applications. They are also more fickle and likely to drop a brand or technology if something better comes along. They have to see value before buying.

Online games are attracting millions of players usually by personal recommendations. Games designed by teens will be played by teens. They want to be able to create and control their online identities across platforms. They want to have their Grand Theft Auto avatar on their Facebook account.

Karen Rohde of SUN talked with Mani Pande of Institute for the Future about teens in the workforce. To attract talent companies will need to use blogs, wikis, instant messaging and texting. Teens multitask and will text message each other while in a meeting. They are more likely to communicate and collaborate. If they don’t know something they will search and find someone who does. They expect flexible schedules and are seeking mentors to plan their careers.

Salina Truong of Gumball Capital spoke about her early desire to do good. As a child she wanted to buy a third world country. As a teen she sold Rubik’s Cubes and snacks and moved on to selling affiliate software on eBay. Now she works with Kiva.org to encourage micro lending around the world.

Larry Magid of CBS moderated the College panel with George Deglin of Berkeley, Jae Joh of Stanford, Mazy Kazerooni of Ustream, Alina Libova of Cal Poly, Jon Osborn of Santa Clara and Jeff Siebert of Stanford. They don’t watch TV or read newspapers. College students still use e-mail and carry laptops. About half the laptops at Stanford are Apple. Upper class students want smart phones that can surf the web like the iPhone or Blackberry. Other kids use basic cell phones and Microsoft Windows. Both groups look for music groups with MySpace. They use Facebook, Salesforce and Google Groups to keep track of friends or contacts. Teens will content as long as there are no strings attached like DRM. They want cell phones that vibrate and text message on faster networks. They like iTunes, Crunchgear, TechCrunch and Woot.com. They want better aggregation and interoperability in software applications. All of this technology makes it easier for them to be more socially and politically active.

Ben Bajrin of Creative Strategies moderated the Investor panel with Andrew Braccia of Accel, Sergio Monsalve of Norwest Venture Partners and Angela Strange of Bay Partners. Despite the current downturn investors and teens know the economy is cyclical and it will turn around. Bad investors and investments stay out of a down market and it is easier to see through the clutter. High energy costs will force the next generation to redesign where they live, work and play. Their technology choices will percolate through society and show up in other age groups. The opportunities are in mobile, content and branding. Right now there is no way for a teen to buy online without a credit card. That is an opportunity, and not just for teens. Fee or subscription models are vulnerable to advertising driven free content models. While they look for opportunities to invest in teen entrepreneurs they still want them to continue their educations.

Richard Escobedo of Teens in Tech spoke about his interest in entrepreneurship from age of seven until his present age of fourteen. He learned to be resourceful, seek help when necessary and to persevere. He started a podcast for teens and uses Twitter, WordPress, Apple and Final Cut Express video. Beyond technology he plays football and the violin.

Courtney Macavinta of Respectrx moderated the Teen Entrepreneurs with Drew Levine, Shooby Kumar and Daniel Brusilovsky. One factor in becoming a young entrepreneur is growing up in a family that values technology and entrepreneurship. They see lower barriers of entry in starting a business, with a great demand for video content.

Non-profits are inspiring teens too. Whitney Smith talked about the Girls for a Change that uses technology to build networks for girls in poor neighborhoods. Elizabeth Stock of Computers for Youth spoke of making learning fun and relevant in ways outside traditional education. Joel Franusic and Adam Smith of SuperHappyDevHouse invited teens to their big open source event at Sun Microsystems Menlo Park campus the next weekend.

Note: Forest Grove OR 8-29-17

Copyright 2008 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS