Tag Archives: James Surowiecki

Oct. 31, 2011 The New Yorker

On Oct. 31, 2011 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “Big Is Beautiful” Small companies do not drive growth as much as large corporations. Big business enjoy economies of scale and are more productive. “…after the Second World War, when American workers became part of the middle class, very big companies employed a huge percentage of the workforce: one in five nonfarm workers worked for a Fortune 500 company.”

Burkhard Bilger wrote “True Grits” about chef Homer Sean Brock efforts to create authentic Southern cooking using heirloom crops and animals.

Copyright 2011 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Oct. 17, 2011 The New Yorker

Oct. 17, 2011 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “How Steve Jobs Changed” about how Jobs was a perfectionist who created devices at the heart of closed systems but knew there were had to be exceptions. “In giving up a little control, Jobs found a lot more power.”

Hendrik Hertzberg wrote “A Walk In The Park” about the spread of the Occupy movement across the country “There are spinoffs in more than a hundred cities and towns from Atlanta to Anchorage, with plans for more.”

Copyright 2011 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Sep. 5, 2011 The New Yorker

Sep. 5, 2011 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “Europe’s Big Mistake” about the European Central Bank (ECB) raising interest rates during the recession and slowing the recovery.

Rebecca Mead wrote “Better,Faster, Stronger” about Silicon Valley self-help guru Timothy Ferris.

Copyright 2011 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Aug. 15, 2011 The New Yorker

On Aug. 15, 2011 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “The Business Of Austerity” about how the Republican Congress caused the US Government to default. By harming the full faith and credit of the United States they caused the stock market to fall, hurting their friends on Wall Street. Austerity hurts recovery.

Dana Goodyear wrote “Grub” about eating bugs as a source of protein.

Elizabeth Kolbert wrote “Sleeping With The Enemy” about what happened to the Neanderthals. Apparently they were not as artistic or creative as humans.

Copyright 2011 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Aug. 1, 2011 The New Yorker

On Aug. 1, 2011 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “Smash The Ceiling” about whether the United States needs a debt ceiling.

Anthony Lane wrote “Hack Work” about Rupert Murdoch’s media empire (News Of The World and Fox News) and its abuses in England and possibly America.

Copyright 2011 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Jul. 11, 2011 The New Yorker

On Jul. 11, 2011 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “Dodger Mania” about the financial problems in Greece. Apparently Greece is in trouble because rich people do not pay their fair share of taxes. Many other people follow their example and it hurts their economy.

Ken Auletta wrote “A Woman’s Place” about Facebook executive Sheryl Sandberg.

Copyright 2011 DJ Cline All rights reserved

Jun. 13, 2011 The New Yorker

On Jun. 13, 2011 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “The Warren Court” about Elizabeth Warren’s efforts to create the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB). The banking lobby is trying to stop her but she may run for US Senator from Massachusetts and become a bigger headache. Warren thinks that informed consumers force companies to compete and create efficient markets.

Annette Gordon Reed wrote “The Persuader” about Harriet Beecher Stowe and her book Uncle Tom’s Cabin.

Copyright 2011 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

May 30, 2011 The New Yorker

On May 30, 2011 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “A Billion Prices Now” about policy makers not having enough accurate information to make timely decisions about the economy. Beginning with the New Deal, the government began collecting statistics to put together Gross National Product (GNP) that became today’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP). To improve upon this, MIT economists Alberto Cavallo and Roberto Rigobin created the Billion Prices Project (BPP) which predicted the economic collapse of September 2008 two months before it showed up in government statistics in November. Having such information can help decide how much intervention or stimulus is needed. Of course it requires courageous politicians to act upon it.

Michael Specter wrote “Resistant” about the history of epidemics, vaccination and human rights. A plague can change history or destroy a civilization. Get your kids immunized.

Copyright 2011 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

May 2, 2011 The New Yorker

May 2, 2011 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “Bitter Pills” about the conflicts in controlling cost while providing good health care. “The ideal system, for most voters, would guarantee all seniors reasonable health care, stop the debt from getting out of control, and keep paying health care providers as before.”

Rivka Galchen wrote “Dream Machine” about quantum computing.

Pankaj Mishra wrote “The Inner Voice” about Mohandas Gandhi.

Anthony Lane wrote “In The Dark” about Werner Herzog’s movie “Cave of Forgotten Dreams.” There is a cave in France with amazing drawings that are over 30,000 years old.

Copyright 2011 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Mar. 21, 2011 The New Yorker

Mar. 21, 2011 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “Scrimmage” about the NFL owners and players. “But the NFL is not capitalist in any traditional sense. The league is more like the trusts that dominated American business in the late nineteenth century, before they were outlawed. The goal is not to embrace competition but to tame it, making the owner’s business less risky and more profitable.”

Paul Tough wrote “The Poverty Clinic” about the Bayview Child Health Center in San Francisco. Medical Director Dr. Nadine Burke talked about serving the patients greater needs that resulted in needing medical care. Poverty is a public health issue. The stress of poverty will kill you.

Copyright 2011 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Feb. 14, 2011 The New Yorker

On Feb. 14, 2011 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “Sputnikonomics” about the how government funding research and development in the space program, interstate highways or the internet resulted in dramatic long term economic growth.

Malcolm Gladwell wrote “The Order Of Things” about college rankings. They do not tell enough about the graduates who finally walk out the door. Quality varies from student to student and what they gained from the experience.

Adam Gopnik wrote “The Information” about books about the Internet and its effects on the world.

Copyright 2011 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Jan. 31, 2011 The New Yorker

On Jan. 31, 2011 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “Don’t Enter The Dragon” about the risk of investing in China. “A lack of transparency and a disregard for accounting regulations are all too common among US listed Chinese firms…” Chinese firms may try a reverse merger by buying American companies listed on the stock exchange to avoid scrutiny by investors or regulators.

David E. Hoffman wrote “Going Viral” about the Pentagon’s efforts to deal with swine flu and other biological threats.

Patricia Marx wrote “The Borrowers” about how people live the illusion of affluence by renting expensive clothes or purses.

Elizabeth Kolbert wrote “America’s Top Parent” about tiger mothers driving their children to excel.

Copyright 2011 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Jan. 17, 2011 The New Yorker

Jan. 17, 2011 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “State Of The Unions” about how the unions of the Great Depression helped create the American middle class after World War Two. People who do not belong to unions do not realize they benefit from their effect on corporations and government programs.

Jill Lepore wrote “The Commandments” about people who worship the US Constitution.

Copyright 2011 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Jan. 3, 2011 The New Yorker

Jan. 3, 2011 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “The Jobs Crisis” In a recession there is not recovery until you have a job. You cannot blame the unemployed for structural unemployment. Government should extend unemployment insurance to those who have lost jobs through no fault of their own and help them get training for the skills that will be in demand.

Copyright 2011 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Dec. 20, 2010 The New Yorker

On Dec. 20, 2010 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “Groupon Clipping” about Internet companies trying remain relevant or part of the next big thing like Google trying to buy Groupon.

Michael Specter wrote “The Doomsday Strain” about scientist Nathan Wolfe’s searching the world for new diseases and cures.

David Owen wrote “The Efficiency Dilemma” about US Secretary of Energy Steven Chu and the idea that increasing energy efficiency might mean we just use more energy.

Pankaj Mishra wrote “Staying Power” about Mao Zedong’s rise in China.

Caleb Crain wrote “Tea And Antipathy” about the real Boston Tea Party and the American Revolution.

Copyright 2010 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Dec. 6, 2010 The New Yorker

On Dec. 6, 2010 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “The Big Uneasy” about the second round of quantitative easing (QE2) by the Federal Reserve. The Fed just buys longer term bonds to help stabilize and stimulate the economy.

Tom Bissel wrote “A Simple Medium” about TV Show creator Chuck Lorre. He has worked with Roseanne, Brett Butler, Cybill Shepherd, Christine Baranski, Charlie Sheen and the cast of the Big Bang Theory.

Copyright 2010 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Nov. 22, 2010 The New Yorker

On Nov. 22, 2010 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “Greedy Geezers” about the inexplicable lack of support of health care reform by some senior citizens. Apparently they are misled by Republican spin doctors. Others seniors see the benefits of everyone having the benefits that seniors enjoy.

Louis Menand wrote “Talk Story” about the history of late night talk shows, particularly Dick Cavett.

Oct. 18, 2010 The New Yorker

On Oct. 18, 2010 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “The Next Level” about category killers store chains that destroy independent small businesses. Toys R Us, CompUSA, Circuit City, Borders and Blockbuster all led their categories by wiping out the competition. They are all in trouble or out of business. Having killed their categories, have they killed themselves. Blockbuster failed to make the transition from bricks to clicks fast enough. Netflix, however, dominated the mailing DVD market but managed to transition into video streaming by moving quickly if not smoothly.

Sean Wilentz wrote “Confounding Fathers” about the Tea Party roots in 1950s McCarthy era paranoia.

Ben McGrath wrote “Search And Destroy” about Gawker Media founder Nick Denton.

Adam Gopnik wrote “Market Man” about Adam Smith, who unlike what some people think, thought you should be nice and generous with people.

Copyright 2010 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Oct. 11, 2010 The New Yorker

Oct. 11, 2010 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “The Business Movie Business” about movies like Oliver Stone’s Wall Street. Corporations are again villains in movies like The Constant Gardener and Michael Clayton like they were during the Great Depression (recommend Baby Face).

Jake Halpern wrote “Pay Up” about bill collectors who cannot pay their bills.

Sep. 20, 2010 The New Yorker

On Sep. 20, 2010 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “Second Helpings” about the government’s successful 2009 economic stimulus program and Republican opposition to a second stimulus program. It is hard to take credit for preventing a worse disaster.

Jose Antonio Vargas wrote “The Face Of Facebook” about Mark Zuckerberg and the movie “The Social Network.”

Louis Menand wrote “Parodies Lost” about humor being hardwired into humans.

Copyright 2010 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Aug. 16, 2010 The New Yorker

On Aug. 16, 2010 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “Soak The Very, Very Rich” about ending the Bush tax cut. Only three percent of Americans make over $250,000 and they would barely notice a slight tax increase. During the Bush Administration, the top one percent saw income grow ten percent versus the bottom ninety-nine percent who only saw income grow only 1.3 percent. French economist Thomas Pinketty says the very rich are becoming the very very rich. This disparity was last seen just before the Stock Market Crash of 1929 that led to the Great Depression. Taxing higher brackets would help governments help more people. The upper ten percent has to realize that if they do not act, they may become the 99 percent and not the one percent.

Joan Acocella wrote “Queen Of Crime” about British mystery writer Agatha Christie.

Copyright 2010 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Aug. 2, 2010 The New Yorker

Aug. 2, 2010 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “Blame Games” about Wall Street blaming the slow economic recovery from their collapse on Obama. They fear regulation that never happened. Fareed Zakaria noted that “…Fortune 500 companies are sitting on a cash hoard of 1.8 trillion.” Do they fear a recovery even more? By pouting, if will they be missing out. They may be holding themselves back.

Elizabeth Kolbert wrote “The Scales Fall” about overfishing. There are no longer plenty of fish in the sea.

Copyright 2010 DJ Cline Al rights reserved.

Oct. 12, 2009 The New Yorker

On Oct. 12 2009 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “Inconspicuous Consumption” about consumers going into debt before the Great Recession and their reduced spending afterward. Prudence and reason prevail until the next recovery.

Ken Auletta wrote “Searching For Trouble” about Google founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin dealing with growth and change.

Copyright 2009 DJ Cline All rights reserved.