Tag Archives: James Surowiecki

Jan. 9, 2017 The New Yorker

On Jan. 9, 2017 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “Shop Till They Drop” about fake news purveyors using social media to drive boycotts. Companies need to think twice about becoming involved with or being identifying with divisive politics. “Trump’s victory has created a political realm in which tens of millions of people feel that if you’re not with them you are against them. That’s a curse for companies that aim for a mass market, America’s traditional strength.”

Kelefa Sanneh wrote “Secret Admirers” about Trump doing what many traditional conservatives want and ignoring the people who voted for him.

Ian Frazier wrote “High-Rise Greens” about new hydroponic technologies to grow more food in cities.

Copyright 2017 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Dec. 19, 2016 The New Yorker

On Dec. 19, 2016 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “Doctor’s Orders” about American Medical Association hundred year battle against health care reform, including repealing Obamacare.

Elizabeth Kolbert wrote “Rage Against The Machine” about robots replacing humans in the workplace. We will be replaced. We will be unemployed. The technological solution will need political, economic and social solutions.

Copyright 2016 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Dec. 5, 2016 The New Yorker

On Dec. 5, 2016 The New Yorker’s Amy Davidson wrote “Transitions” about the president elect’s cabinet and staff appointments and conflicts of interest. “Trump has a shot at being the country’s worst President but Americans are not in the worst position they have ever been in from which to confront him.”

James Surowiecki wrote “Trump Sets Private Prisons Free” about the Correction Corporation Of America and other private prisons new lease on life with the new administration. Chris Patella of Bates College and others find private prisons to be less cost effective than government ones despite cutting corners. “Worse, private prisons have an obvious incentive to keep people inside as long as possible. America has more people in prison than any other and private prisons are part of this system of mass incarceration.

Copyright 2016 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Nov. 28, 2016 The New Yorker

On Nov. 28, 2016 The New Yorker’s Jelani Cobb wrote “States Vs. Trump” about liberals using states rights to defy the new administration. On November 10, 2016 Kevin de Leon of the California Senate and Anthony Rendon of the California Assembly stated “Today, we woke up feeling like strangers in a foreign land.” “Thirty-nine million people live in California – twelve percent of the population of the United States. The state is home to the economic and cultural axes of Silicon Valley and Hollywood. Last year its economy became the sixth largest in the world, a spot formerly held by France.”

James Surowiecki wrote “Trump’s Infrastructure Promises”  about the new administration’s strategy to increase debt, put money in the hands of the wealthy, create no jobs for the poor and won’t build new infrastructure.

Nicola Tilley wrote “Cold Remedy” about doctors lowering a gunshot victim’s body temperature to the low fifties (Fahrenheit) with ice cold saline. The patient can be in a state of suspended animation for an hour and slowly brought back to life.

Daniel Zalewski wrote “The Factory of Fakes” about archaeologists using digital technology to create copies of threatened antiquities for future generations.

Copyright 2016 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

November 14, 2016 The New Yorker

On November 14, 2016 The New Yorker’s Nicholas Schmidle wrote “About Face Bad Guys” about conservative pundit Glenn Beck’s regretting everything he has said over the years. “So much of what I used to believe was either always a sham or has been made into a sham. There is nothing deep.””These people scare the hell out of me.”

James Surowiecki wrote “What’s In A Name” about the lengths corporations go to find the right name and still fail.

Copyright 2016 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Oct. 17, 2016 The New Yorker

Oct. 17, 2016 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “Trump’s Other Tax Ploy” about his proposed tax break which is similar to every other Republican tax plan. Low taxes for the rich and big deficits and less help for the poor. “And his plan will only reinforce the image of the Republican party as the home of rich people something that has already started to worry a few Republicans.”

Copyright 2016 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Sep. 19, 2016 The New Yorker

On Sep. 19, 2016 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “The Thick Blue Line” about how police unions protect their members. It is an example for other workers.

Nick Paumgarten wrote “Wild Man” about Patagonia co-founder Yvon Chouinard’s efforts to build a sustainable company and planet. He said “Trump is the perfect person to take us to the Apocalypse.”

Copyright 2016 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Sep. 5, 2016 The New Yorker

On Sep. 5, 2016 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “Sick Business” about Obamacare (originally Romneycare) and insurance companies. “Since managing risk is typically key to how insurance companies make money it would have made sense to leave them out and just enroll everyone in a government-run program like Medicare.”

Copyright 2016 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Aug. 8, 2016 The New Yorker

On Aug. 8, 2016 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “The Perils Of Executive Action” about President Obama’s getting around Republican obstructionism using executive action. The problem is that it can be overturned by whoever is elected after him. “the power of the President is greater than ever. The choice of a President matters more than ever, too.”

Jill Lepore wrote “The War And The Roses” about the Republican and Democratic conventions.

Jon Lee Anderson wrote “The Distant Shore” about protecting isolated Amazon tribes in Peru.

Copyright 2016 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Apr. 25, 2016 The New Yorker

On Apr. 25, 2016 The New Yorker’s Jelani Cobb wrote “Working Class Heroes” about conservative attitudes toward poor communities. Conservative commentator Kevin Williamson said “The truth about these dysfunctional downscale communities is that they deserve to die.” I am surprised he did not ask if there were any prisons.

James Surowiecki wrote “Unlikely Alliances” about big corporations supporting LGBT issues. Civil rights are good for business.

Andrew Marantz wrote “Studio 360” about the latest in virtual reality.

Copyright 2016 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Apr. 18 2016 The New Yorker

On Apr. 18, 2016 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “System Overload” about America’s aging infrastructure. It affects every aspect of the country from the economy to public health and yet it is underfunded. Conservatives have been blocking building projects even though poor people will benefit. They want free trade agreements and federal dollars to invest and hide overseas. “infrastructure is the ultimate public good.”

Copyright 2016 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Sep. 7, 2015 The New Yorker

On Sep. 7, 2015 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “Drop In The Bucket” about the stock market crashes and slower economic growth in China.

Stacy Schiff wrote “The Witches Of Salem” about how nineteen people were accused of being witches and executed in 1692. The witch hunt was a combination a greed and hysteria against people who may have been a little odd versus people who wanted more property and power. Things did not turn out the way they thought. Hundreds of years later the villains were rightly remembered as villains in Arthur Miller’s play The Crucible. They thought it would all die down, but they were to be constantly reminded of their sins. Maybe they could have compensated their victims but that is hard to do when they are dead. Instead they were haunted by history. Today they would be (and are) held accountable on the Internet. :-)

Copyright 2015 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Jul. 27, 2015 The New Yorker

On Jul. 27, 2016 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “How Can Greece Take Charge?” about the need for stimulating their export economy and increasing employment for young educated professionals. “Opening up the Greek economy would benefit ordinary citizens, since the economies myriad rules and regulations serve mainly to protect the wealth and those lucky enough to have won a sinecure.”

Copyright 21015 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

May 18, 2015 The New Yorker

On May 18, 2015 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “New Ways To Crash The Market” about machine trading causing a flash crash with no explanation. The algorithmic trading is vulnerable to spoofing with fake buy or sell orders making markets more unstable. “It’s also how we’ve arrived at a situation where a trillion dollars can vanish in a matter of minutes, even though the real world hasn’t changed at all.”

Raffi Khatchadourian wrote “World Without End” about Sean Murray’s company Hello Games. The new virtual reality game No Man’s Sky allows users  explore software generated galaxies. I wonder if it could be adapted to find other habitable worlds.

Tad Friend wrote “Tomorrow’s Advance Man” about venture capitalist Marc Andreessen of Netscape and his new firm a16z. He believes that Bitcoin, Soylent and Oculus VR will change the world by building a nerd nation. The article has one particularly disturbing passage. “Some Silicon Valley V.C.s  believe that these values would have greater say if their community left America behind: Andreessen’s nerd nation with a charter and geographic locale. Peter Thiel favors “seasteading,” establishing floating cities in the middle of the ocean. Bali Srinivasan, until recently a general partner at a16z and now chairman of one of its Bitcoin companies, has called for the “ultimate exit.” Arguing that the United States is as fossilized as Microsoft, and the Valley has become stronger than Boston, New York, Los Angeles, and Washington, D.C. combined, Srinivasan believes that it denizens should build an opt-in society, ultimately outside the U.S., run by technology.”

John Colapinto wrote “Lighting The Brain” about Karl Deisseroth. He is a pioneer in optogenetics, technology that activates individual brain cells with light from fiber optics. It can be used to control behavior in lab animals and is being tested on humans.

Copyright 2015 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

May 4, 2015 The New Yorker

On May 4, 2015 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “Back To Basics” about companies like General Electric are getting out of finance and returning to manufacturing. “Suddenly, the U.S. sees like a reasonably affordable place to make high-end products, like G.E.’s jet engines and gas and wind turbines.”

Dana Goodyear wrote “The Dying Sea” about Southern California’s need for water from the Imperial Valley and the impact it may have on the Salton Sea.

Ryan Lizza wrote “The Virtual Candidate” about US Senator Elizabeth Warren’s affect on former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s candidacy for president.

Malcom Gladwell wrote “The Engineer’s Lament” about determining safety issues in automobiles like the Ford Pinto.

Copyright 2015 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Mar. 23, 2015 The New Yorker

On Mar. 16, 2015 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “In Praise of Short Sellers” about activist short selling investors. They shorted Lumber Liquidators stock based on reports that they were selling carcinogenic formaldehyde laminate wood products made in China. “stock prices are more accurate when short sellers are active.

Louis Menand wrote “A Friend Of The Devil” Soviet and American involvement in student organizations during the Cold War.

Note: 11-5-17 Beaverton OR Yahoo!

Copyright 2015 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Mar. 9, 2015 The New Yorker

On Mar. 9, 2015 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “Greece’s Next Move” about the Greek financial crisis. Many rich people and corporations in Greece did not pay their fair share of taxes causing massive deficits. Austerity measures forced from outside are creating a humanitarian crisis. If the debt is forgiven like in Argentina, Iceland or Germany, the economy may grow back at a substantial rate.

Copyright 2015 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Feb. 9, 2015 The New Yorker

On Feb. 9, 2015 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “A Fair Day’s Wage” about how after the New Deal and until the 1970s, many business paid a living wage, a policy supported by management specialists like Peter Drucker. Today, many companies “treat frontline workers as disposable commodities.” That may be changing. Recently, Aetna’s CEO Mark Bertolini read Thomas Piketty’s book “Capital In The Twentieth Century” and decided to raise his lowest paid workers hourly rate by at least twelve dollars an hour. Bertolini says “It’s hard for people to be fully engage with customers when they’re worrying about how to put food on the table.” MIT’s Zeynep Ton, author of  new book “The Good Job Strategy” says higher wages make “these companies end up with motivated, capable workers, better service, and increased sales.”

Copyright 2015 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Jan. 26, 2015 The New Yorker

On Jan. 26, 2015 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “The Shake Shack Economy” about the rise of fast casual restaurants. Apparently food that tastes that better than McDonalds gets more customers. Duh.

Jill Lepore wrote “The Cobweb” about Brewster Kahle, the Internet Archive and Wayback Machine in San Francisco. Not everything on the web stays inline forever. Many links no longer work. Content is missing. If the power goes off, no one in the future will know what happened after the year 2000. They would have to send somebody back to find out and save it all for future reference :-)

Copyright 2015 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Jan. 12, 2015 The New Yorker

On Jan. 12, 2015 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “The Mortgage Mistake” about the disadvantages of buying a house for ordinary Americans. “The real winners are the banks, which can make these loans without worrying about the risk; the government – the taxpayer- has them covered.”

Margaret Talbot wrote “The Talking Cure” about the importance of talking to very young children growing up in poverty. “Though cultural factors may well explain why some low-income parents talk relatively little with their toddlers, the most obvious explanation is poverty itself.

Copyright 2015 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Dec. 22, 2014 The New Yorker

On Dec. 22, 2014 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “How Low Can Oil Go?” about fluctuating oil prices having less effect on the economy.

John Colapinto wrote “Material Question” Andre Geim’s discovery of graphene. The material that is one atom thick and a gapless semiconductor.

Adam Gopnik wrote “The Fires Of Paris” about the Paris Commune of 1871 and the temporary establishment of a radical left wing government.

Copyright 2014 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Nov. 3, 2014 The New Yorker

On Nov. 3, 2014 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “Le Divorce” about when mergers become divergers. Hewlett-Packard is spinning off Symantec, Symantec is spinning off Veritas and eBay is spinning off PayPal. One effect is that high performing employees get more money.

Jess Row wrote a short story called “The Empties” about a woman surviving an apocalypse in Vermont.

Copyright 2014 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Oct. 20, 2014 The New Yorker

On Oct. 20, 2014, The New Yorker magazine had a James Surowiecki article “Content and Its Discontents.” It talked about Netflix and its shift from not only supplying content but creating it. Louis Menand’s “Crooner Rights Spat” deals with the current mess with copyright and intellectual property in the digital age.

Copyright 2014 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Sep. 22, 2014 The New Yorker

On Sep. 22, 2014 The New Yorker magazine had two articles of interest. James Surowiecki article “Home Free” discusses Utah’s Homeless Task Force with its director Lloyd Pendleton. Their Housing First program spends eight thousand dollars on permanent housing for the homeless versus twenty thousand for traditional homeless shelters. Who knew the solution for the homeless was…homes?

Jill Lepore’s “The Last Amazon” is about Wonder Woman and her roots in early twentieth century feminism.

Copyright 2014 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Jul. 7, 2014 The New Yorker

On Jul. 7, 2014, The New Yorker magazine’s James Surowiecki wrote “Moaning Moguls” about the Committee for Economic Development (CED) which after WWII pushed for strong unions and big government programs so most people would benefit from capitalism. Reasonable and generous reforms would also blunt more radical reforms if people thought the rich were just getting richer at their expense.

Copyright 2014 DJ Cline All rights reserved.