Tag Archives: HP

Jul. 17, 2012 Global Career Fair Tech Symposium

On July 17, 2012 at the Santa Clara Convention Center, the fourth annual Global Career Fair with Tech Symposium hosted panel discussions on cloud computing, big data, mobile and security issues. Some of the speakers attending: Stefan Andreasen of Kapow, Anjul Bhambhri of IBM, Jake Flomenberg of Accel, Brian Johnson of eBay, KRS Murthy of I Cubed, Sumeet Singh of Yahoo, Bala Venkatrao of Cloudera and Bob Wiedenhold of Couchbase. Companies looking for talent were Apple, Arista, Barnes and Noble, BMSOFT Systems, Citrix, Couchbase, HCL, HP, Infosys, Pocket Gems and Tata.

Copyright 2012 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

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Oct. 15, 2010 SDF Open Innovation and the Ecosystem Conference

Oct. 15, 2010 in Palo Alto at HP, SDForum held the Open Innovation and the Ecosystem Conference. Experts shared how innovation works for large and small companies at the local and international level.

Anthony Wasserman, Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley made the welcoming remarks. Ted Shelton of Open-First introduced opening keynote speaker Judy Estrin, CEO of Jlabs and author of “Closing the Innovation Gap”. She spoke of the need for sustainable innovation culture where people are comfortable taking risk. While everyone wants a breakthrough, most corporate innovation is incremental, meeting only existing customer expectations. Henry Ford said if he had given customers what they wanted, they would have gotten a faster horse. The challenge is to encourage orthogonal innovation, where an existing product is used in a new way. Apple did not invent the MP3 player, the cell phone or tablet, but it found an innovative way to use both with the iPod, iPhone and iPad.

Rich Friedrich, Director of Strategy and Innovation Office at HP Labs gave a company keynote on “Open Innovation at HP Labs.” Mobile sensors measuring our surroundings will transform the way we collect and use information in areas like weather, traffic or even bio-signs.

Ping Li of Accel Partners and Mike Olson of Cloudera had a fireside chat. Olson’s previous company was bought by Oracle and he wanted to do something different. He found it in the cloud. He thinks Hadoop and other tools will cause the biggest change since the introduction of the relational database thirty years ago. All of this data cannot be kept private if we want to use it effectively. We must penalize people who misuse it. An example would be insurance companies having access to medical records but they could not deny coverage based on it.

Deborah Magid, IBM Venture Group gave a keynote on “The Innovator’s Dilemma.” IBM made an early commitment to open source and Linux. They have a long track record of innovation and are investing in the cloud and mobile spaces.

Chris Yeh of PBWorks moderated panelists Christine Crandell of Accept Corporation, Riley Gibson of Napkin Labs, Guy Martin of CollabNet and Padmanabh Dabke of Spigit. The topic was “Innovation in Practice.” If you don’t have a research and development lab, start one. Promote risk and accept failure in a culture of cross discipline. Reward courage.

Doug Solomon of IDEO spoke of his five principles in “Building Innovation Tools that Work,” The challenge was to design a system to share knowledge effectively in an organization. IDEO developed an internal social media site that builds pointers to people and not just the data they produce. People need to be rewarded for participating. They should demand intuitive interfaces. They must take the road more traveled by finding the way most users are comfortable communicating. Learn from these steps and keep iterating early and often.

Pascal Finette, Director of Mozilla Labs gave his perspective on browser innovation.

Mike Cassidy of San Jose Mercury News moderated panelists Raj Apte of PARC, Denis Browne of SAP and John Wolpert, CEO of UpStart Mobile. The topic was “Silicon Valley Innovators: How They Do What They Do?” They look outside their own companies for new ideas and trends.

Henry Tirri of Nokia Research Center gave the closing keynote.

Copyright 2010 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

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Aug. 15, 2008 SDF Innovation and Research Fair

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On Aug. 15, 2008 at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, SDForum held the Corporate Innovation and Research Fair. Technology leaders from eBay, HP, Microsoft, Oracle, SAP and Sun talked about innovation and collaborating with entrepreneurs. You would think that all these fierce competitors under one roof would be like watching a watering hole in Africa. In fact everybody faced the same challenges of creating something new and getting it in the hands of customers. Text from DJCline.com. Continue reading Aug. 15, 2008 SDF Innovation and Research Fair

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May 13, 2008 SDF Teen Tech 2

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On May 13, 2008 at HP in Palo Alto, SDForum held it’s second annual Teen Tech event. NPR, the San Jose Mercury News and CBS 60 Minutes covered this year’s bigger event.

One way to see the future is to meet the people who will be living in it. The Teen Tech event is a good way to see what the next fifty years will be like. Teens connect with each other while moving through physical and virtual space using voice, video, text messaging and games. Teens are moving beyond social networking to building businesses with each other. The question is not what technology teens will buy but what technology they will sell to the rest of us.

SDForum’s CEO Susan Lucas-Conwell and HP’s Debra Brackeen kicked off the event by introducing Anshul Samar of Alchemist Empire. Samar created a game where chemical elements and compounds become essentially action figures with particular properties. It has sold thousands of copies around the world.

Stephanie Olsen of Cnet moderated the High School panel with Deanna Alexander, Priyanka Bhatia, Sekal Hathi and Jonathan Wilde. Teens seldom watch TV but do watch YouTube. It would be nice to see a new episode on a big TV. They listen to music from iTunes and movies on Netflix and search for reviews on Google. They spend six hours a day on the laptops doing homework, reading and e-mailing because it can reach teachers, relatives or potential employers outside their age group. Students want teachers to create consistent user interfaces with lectures online and interactive whiteboards for online classes.

While they have no trouble learning new technical skills they still want to work on their real world social skills. Facebook is more popular and less complicated than MySpace. Most smart phones are not as smart as the iPhone. They want GPS, decent video and calendars interfaces that are easier to use. Like their parents, they are very concerned about privacy and safety. They are more likely to participate in causes online than their parents.

Allison Leopold Tilley of Pillsbury Winthrop moderated the second panel with Steve Hoffman of ROCKETON, JD Lewin of Microsoft, Matt Thompson of Sun, and Ameer Karim of HP. Millennials are so adept at new technology that their parents ask them for technical advice. They see teens more mobile, more virtual and more likely to use or develop open source applications. They are also more fickle and likely to drop a brand or technology if something better comes along. They have to see value before buying.

Online games are attracting millions of players usually by personal recommendations. Games designed by teens will be played by teens. They want to be able to create and control their online identities across platforms. They want to have their Grand Theft Auto avatar on their Facebook account.

Karen Rohde of SUN talked with Mani Pande of Institute for the Future about teens in the workforce. To attract talent companies will need to use blogs, wikis, instant messaging and texting. Teens multitask and will text message each other while in a meeting. They are more likely to communicate and collaborate. If they don’t know something they will search and find someone who does. They expect flexible schedules and are seeking mentors to plan their careers.

Salina Truong of Gumball Capital spoke about her early desire to do good. As a child she wanted to buy a third world country. As a teen she sold Rubik’s Cubes and snacks and moved on to selling affiliate software on eBay. Now she works with Kiva.org to encourage micro lending around the world.

Larry Magid of CBS moderated the College panel with George Deglin of Berkeley, Jae Joh of Stanford, Mazy Kazerooni of Ustream, Alina Libova of Cal Poly, Jon Osborn of Santa Clara and Jeff Siebert of Stanford. They don’t watch TV or read newspapers. College students still use e-mail and carry laptops. About half the laptops at Stanford are Apple. Upper class students want smart phones that can surf the web like the iPhone or Blackberry. Other kids use basic cell phones and Microsoft Windows. Both groups look for music groups with MySpace. They use Facebook, Salesforce and Google Groups to keep track of friends or contacts. Teens will content as long as there are no strings attached like DRM. They want cell phones that vibrate and text message on faster networks. They like iTunes, Crunchgear, TechCrunch and Woot.com. They want better aggregation and interoperability in software applications. All of this technology makes it easier for them to be more socially and politically active.

Ben Bajrin of Creative Strategies moderated the Investor panel with Andrew Braccia of Accel, Sergio Monsalve of Norwest Venture Partners and Angela Strange of Bay Partners. Despite the current downturn investors and teens know the economy is cyclical and it will turn around. Bad investors and investments stay out of a down market and it is easier to see through the clutter. High energy costs will force the next generation to redesign where they live, work and play. Their technology choices will percolate through society and show up in other age groups. The opportunities are in mobile, content and branding. Right now there is no way for a teen to buy online without a credit card. That is an opportunity, and not just for teens. Fee or subscription models are vulnerable to advertising driven free content models. While they look for opportunities to invest in teen entrepreneurs they still want them to continue their educations.

Richard Escobedo of Teens in Tech spoke about his interest in entrepreneurship from age of seven until his present age of fourteen. He learned to be resourceful, seek help when necessary and to persevere. He started a podcast for teens and uses Twitter, WordPress, Apple and Final Cut Express video. Beyond technology he plays football and the violin.

Courtney Macavinta of Respectrx moderated the Teen Entrepreneurs with Drew Levine, Shooby Kumar and Daniel Brusilovsky. One factor in becoming a young entrepreneur is growing up in a family that values technology and entrepreneurship. They see lower barriers of entry in starting a business, with a great demand for video content.

Non-profits are inspiring teens too. Whitney Smith talked about the Girls for a Change that uses technology to build networks for girls in poor neighborhoods. Elizabeth Stock of Computers for Youth spoke of making learning fun and relevant in ways outside traditional education. Joel Franusic and Adam Smith of SuperHappyDevHouse invited teens to their big open source event at Sun Microsystems Menlo Park campus the next weekend.

Note: Forest Grove OR 8-29-17

Copyright 2008 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

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