Tag Archives: Facebook

Nov. 6, 2017 Machine Learning

On Nov. 6, 2017 The New York Times reporter Cade Metz wrote “The Rise Of The Machine: To Speed A.I. Advance, Technology Industry Aims To Edge Aside Humans.” Google’s Jeff Dean, Sundar Pichai and Barret Zopf talked about their machine learning algorithm software called AutoML that builds other algorithms. Self driving cars and facial recognition for security need this software.  Unfortunately, only about 10,000 people worldwide have the experience to create such algorithms. Amazon, Facebook, Google and Microsoft are paying top dollar for big data experts and data scientists. “The shortage is not going away anytime soon, just because mastering these skills takes years of work.” Microsoft’s Joseph Sirosh said about developing neural networks “We are eliminating a lot of the heavy lifting.” Jean Gagne of Element AI says it is a new kind of computer programming. Berkeley’s Pieter Abbeel thinks that computer invented algorithms can solve many problems very quickly. Carnegie Mellon’s Renato Neghrino say it is only a matter of when.

Copyright 2017 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Feb. 5, 2017 Blumbers

Citizen Status Symbol

On Jan. 29, 2017, Bloomberg’s Peter Elstrom and Saritha Rai wrote “Trump’s Next Immigration Move to Hit Closer to Home for Tech” about the new administration’s immigration restrictions on high tech workers. It affected Infosys, TCS, Tech Mahindra and Wipro’s ability to supply cheap H1B labor to Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google, Salesforce, Microsoft and Twitter. “Ron Hira, an associate professor at Howard University, who has done extensive research on the subject, points out workers at outsourcers are typically not treated as well as others. The median wage at outsourcing firms for H-1B workers was less than $70,000, while Apple, Google and Microsoft paid their employees in the program more than $100,000, according to data he collected. That suggests the American companies are going after true, highly skilled employees, while the outsourcers are recruiting less expensive talent, he said.”

On Jan. 31, 2017, The New Republic’s Clio Chang wrote “Silicon Valley’s Uneasy Muslim Ban Dance” about Silicon Valley’s reaction to the new restrictions. “Within the structure of American capitalism, the average tech CEO has more in common with a billionaire like Donald Trump than with the average immigrant worker or refugee. That many of them continue to find ways to work with Trump and to undercut protests to protect their profits should come as no surprise. Trump is ushering in a plutocratic era that requires us to demand the most from those in powerful positions; to do so, we must first shed the assumption that Silicon Valley is on the side of the people.”

Quietly many tech executives are furious. They helped get the president elected hoping they would not have to pay taxes. The money they thought they would make may have to go toward hiring US citizens at market rates. Citizens also have an advantage because they have no travel restrictions as there might be with visas or green cards. Foreign workers who are captive in a way that even Frederick Douglass would be concerned but U.S. citizens can just walk across the street. You know, all that free market stuff conservatives talk about, until they need help.

Copyright 2017 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Jan. 22, 2015 Like It Or Not

Somebody wanted me to read their article online. I visited their site and a window popped up asking me to like the article on Facebook. How can I like an article I have not read yet? There was no opt-out or close button. I backed out and decided not to “like” any of it.

Copyright 2016 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

2013 Top Ten Predictions

1. North Korea stages a Gangnam style demonstration with one million people that can be seen from space.

2. The Fiscal Cliff will be followed by a Cliff Huxtable, where politicians will have to wear ugly sweaters and rhapsodize about pudding.

3. It will be revealed that Apple’s gorilla glass is made by real gorillas.

4. To continue expansion, Facebook will reach an agreement with Ancestry.com to begin creating accounts for dead relatives. Instagram will add an oil painting filter.

5. Amazon will offer a rare collection of Philip K. Dick’s laundry and grocery lists on Kindle Fire only. The lists will be turned into movies. “Rye Bread And Cheese” will win an Oscar for special effects.

6. California will allow drivers to text, but only to really attractive people.

7. Texas will allow drivers to text but only if they use their handgun as a stylus.

8. Washington state will legalize marijuana. Wait, didn’t they already do that? Oh man…

9. J.K. Rowling will release a surprise book “Harry Potter Magically Pays Off His Student Loans.”

10. An asteroid will collide with earth but not before explaining it got the Mayan calendar wrong.

Copyright 2012 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Aug. 8, 2012 SVForum Main Event

On August 8, 2012 in Palo Alto at Cooley LLP, SVForum’s Main Event topic was “Raising Capital for Early Stage Technology Companies.” Greg Clark of Cooley LLP moderated panelists Jim Connor of Sand Hill Angels, Michael Harries of Citrix Startup Accelerator, Saad Khan of CMEA Capital and John Suh of Hyundai Ventures.

They discussed how even with reduced costs of startups and supportive incubators, companies still need venture capital. The options range from Ron Conway’s portfolio strategy angels to Mike Maples and his “Thunder lizard” to Band of Angels, Sand Hill Angels, and Angels’ Forum. Many investors are looking at social, mobile and big data because of the lower barriers to entry. An ideal candidate would be an experienced engineer leading an energetic team with an existing revenue stream and a business plan to sell the startup to a larger buyer like the Instagram Facebook acquisition.

Copyright 2012 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Jul. 27, 2012 US Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, Joint Chiefs of Staff

On Friday, July 27, 2012 in San Francisco at Mark Hopkins Intercontinental Hotel, the Commonwealth Club and the Marines Memorial Association hosted General Martin E. Dempsey, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. He spoke on “Current International Security Challenges and the Future of the U.S.” with George Scalise, President of Semiconductor Industry Association. Dempsey was wrapping up a tour in Silicon Valley after meeting the staff of Facebook and other high tech companies. He thinks they should be thinking about the future at least as much as the military does.

Earlier this week, Dempsey oversaw the changeover in command at the Defense Intelligence Agency from Burgess to Flynn. It is part of a larger process of better cooperation between the military and civilians to speed up the gathering and acting upon timely intelligence using emerging technology.

He also spoke about the military shift from the Middle East to the Asia Pacific region. While some see this as a way to contain China’s growing influence, he thinks it would be unusual if the United States did not have any presence in the region. The challenge will be to do this with smaller budgets and fewer personnel. America has over 300 million people but fewer than three million active and reserve duty personnel. The all volunteer military is more diverse and far different than the days of the draft. Professional soldiers have more training to operate complex equipment in chaotic situations. Even if there were a draft, only one in four young people can meet the all the physical and academic requirements to serve. A military is only as strong as the citizens it defends.

At a press conference afterwards, Mark Matthews of ABC KGO-TV asked about the recent trouble at Lackland Air Force Base. I recommend checking Matthews report on this. Jeff King of CNN was there as well. At a later funny moment, Dempsey wryly commented on my camera as being very “stealthy.” If it really were, he would not have noticed it. I hope he enjoys the pictures.

Copyright 2012 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Jul. 24, 2012 SVForum PWC Mobile

On July 24, 2012, in Palo Alto at Pillsbury Winthrop, SVForum with PWC presented a Quarterly Venture Breakfast on Mobile. Stanley Pierson of Pillsbury Winthrop moderated panelists Steve Bengston of PwC, Bob Borchers of Opus Capital, Kim Morgan of Motorola Mobility and Venu Pemmaraju of Intel Capital. By definition the mobile market is in constant motion. Five years ago Europe’s infrastructure and Nokia led the way. Today, Apple’s iPhone and Google’s Android dominate the discussions. Five years ago most Facebook users were on PCs, now most are mobile as trend accelerates.

There are still challenges. Batteries face physical restraints that are addressed with software managing power. There is a debate about how much personal information should be on the device versus in the cloud. Content providers have to deal with smaller screens to accommodate advertising. Company brand managers now understand that an app can be the ad to target customers. Of course, making a purchase may not be easy. The promise of Near Field Communication (NFC) has bogged down in dealing with banks, carriers, device manufactures and merchants. The solution may already exist. Apple started iTunes selling music and then expanded to movies, television, movies, books and magazines. Amazon started selling books, but now you can buy appliances through them. How far away are we from buying a cup of coffee through iTunes or Amazon? Monetizing mobility is a moving target.

Copyright 2012 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

May 28, 2012 The New Yorker

On May 28, 2012 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “Unequal Shares” about Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg creating two classes of shares in the IPO in what is called a dual class structure. Google, Groupon, LinkedIn, Yelp and Zynga did the same when it went public. It is a strategy to keep control of a company and avoid short term pressure from investors but the stock can under perform in the market. IPOs are not as attractive as remaining private or being bought by another company.

Copyright 2012 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Facebook Facebubble

Facebook had its IPO today. The stock price closed at few cents up from where it opened. Considering all the hype, many people were expecting more. An IPO is not like winning the lottery. It is a sign that company is growing up. I am not surprised. I am relieved.

Copyright 2012 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Nov. 2, 2011 ASAP Gang Of Four War

On November 2, 2011 in San Jose at Cisco, the ASAP Silicon Valley held “Changing the Game: The Age of the Platform and the 24-Hour Customer.” ASAP leaders Nimma Bakshi of PWC and John Soper of New Paradigms moderated Sherrick Murdoff of Salesforce, Adrian Ott of Exponential Edge Consulting and Phil Simon of Phil Simon Systems.

In reaction to a Fast Company magazine article, Adrian Ott, author of “The 24-Hour Customer” and Phil Simon author of “The Age of the Platform” talked with Sherrick Murdoff about the coming “Gang Of Four” war for consumer attention from social media giants like Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google.

Copyright 2011 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

 

 

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Jul. 11, 2011 The New Yorker

On Jul. 11, 2011 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “Dodger Mania” about the financial problems in Greece. Apparently Greece is in trouble because rich people do not pay their fair share of taxes. Many other people follow their example and it hurts their economy.

Ken Auletta wrote “A Woman’s Place” about Facebook executive Sheryl Sandberg.

Copyright 2011 DJ Cline All rights reserved

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

May 19, 2011 Commonwealth Club Eli Pariser MoveOn.org

On May 19, 2011 in Mountain View  at the Silicon Valley Community Foundation,  the Commonwealth Club hosted Eli Pariser of MoveOn.org and author of “The Filter Bubble: What the Internet Is Hiding from You.” The book describes how personalization on the Internet controls and limits the information we get. Once users’ online profiles are known the information they get is filtered to their tastes and they are not challenged outside their comfort zones. Political debate on facts leading to reasonable compromise becomes difficult and could threaten the democratic process.

He thinks companies like Google and Facebook filter and customize searches, undermining the Internet’s original purpose to be an open platform for ideas and information. He talked about about the hidden Web and how to people can protect themselves and their personal information online.

Get outside your comfort zone. Try to meet people outside the circle of people you meet. Think twice about the information you find online.

Copyright 2011 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Mar. 1, 2011 GABA Social Media

On Tuesday, March 1, 2011 in Palo Alto at SNR Denton, GABA hosted a presentation on social media. Jennifer Vessels of Next Step moderated panelists Sandra McCandless of SNR Denton, Neale Mulligan of Equinix, Vicente Silveira of LinkedIn, Chris Tracy of One True Fan and Sam Weller of Reputation.com. They discussed the challenges of using social media like Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter in a WikiLeaks world.

Copyright 2011 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Feb. 1, 2011 SDF PWC

On Tuesday, February 1, 2011 in Palo Alto at Pillsbury Winthrop, SDForum presented a Quarterly Venture Breakfast with Pillsbury Winthrop and PricewaterhouseCoopers. Allison Leopold-Tilley of Pillsbury Winthrop moderated panelists Steve Bengston of PricewaterhouseCoopers, Tim Chang of Norwest Venture Partners, Mark Gorenberg of Hummer Winblad Venture Partners, Todd MacLean of Accel Partners and Jon Sakoda of NEA.

Where 2009 was a tough year, 2010 was a mixed year. Venture capitalists invested ten billion dollars more than they raised. Something has got to give and it will probably be the weaker VCs. Most of it went to cleantech, biotech, and medical devices facing infrastructure and regulatory obstacles. Meanwhile the mobile space grew with the demand for smart phones and the services they use.

With the economy down for so long, there is a thirst for growth. Companies with lots of cash are looking for new opportunities. The problem is the symbiotic relationship between M&A and IPOs does not work well in environment with Sarbanes Oxley and investors burned by too many bubbles. Few startups want to have an IPO and therefore have less leverage in negotiating M&As. Not every startup is like Facebook where they can attract large amounts of investment from Goldman Sachs and Russian private equity.

Which brings up the issue of foreign investment and growth. China has bigger market, more companies, more growth and more deals than the United States. While many Chinese startups come to America for the prestige of getting money from Silicon Valley VCs, eventually they may get more money staying home. The question is how to exit in a market that may be less transparent or stable.

The lack of foreign capital could mean a return to normal. At this point the number of jobs and the amount of investment in Silicon Valley are about where they were in the 1990s, before everything was caught up in the dotcom bubble. Most of the VC money in the country is still spent here. As VCs chase bigger deals, super angels are stepping in. While investors create wealth with M&As, they do not create jobs. Large companies are buying startups not just for their intellectual property but their talented employees. This process only consolidates the number of jobs. In order to increase the number of jobs, we need to increase the number of IPOs.

The next year will see the further rise of Apple, Facebook and Google platforms in the mobile space. Moving operations to the cloud will be normal. BRIC countries will continue to grow while other countries try to emulate them. After years of decline, there is a chance for growth.

Copyright 2011 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Dec. 2, 2010 SDF Mobile Holiday Event

December 2, 2010 in Palo Alto at Nokia, the SDForum Mobile SIG held a Sponsor Appreciation & Holiday Event. Sponsors presenting their 2011 initiatives were Microsoft, Nokia, Orange and SAP. Bruno  Terkaly of Microsoft gave an overview of Windows Phone 7 overview for consumers. Tony Kueh of SAP’s Sybase talked about payments, carrier provisioning, SMS and MMS transactions. Satya  Mallya of Orange talked about apps, systems integration and and running multiple operating systems. Samir Agarwal of MeeGo explained how MeeGo is true open source and a handset will be available in the first quarter of 2011.

Joe Jasin took an audience survey of 47 people about which of the many OS’s which were the top 3 for the audience to develop on presently. I did not believe the the results, but maybe it was just the crowd:

Android 25
Symbian 3
Brew 0
Microsoft 6
MeeGo 6
BREW 0
Apple 8
Palm 3
RIM 0

Jasin also asked “If Facebook were to have an OS ready tomorrow would you develop on it?” The answer was a unanimous NO! He was surprised, and said, “Wow, now lets get the age demographic in the room.”

I would like to thank Joe Jasin for his contribution to this article.

Copyright 2010 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

October 8, 2010 CTIA WCA LBS

On October 8, 2010 in San Francisco at Moscone West, WCA hosted a session at CTIA Enterprise & Applicationsâ„¢ entitled “What’s Hot About LBS?” Philip E. Hendrix of immr and GigaOM moderated panelists Lawrence Coburn of Double Dutch, Laura Diaz of Verizon Wireless, Ian Heidt of Qualcomm, Larry Magid of CBS, Eghosa Omoigui an independent venture capitalist, Sanjaya Krishna of KPMG, and Rob Reed of MomentFeed.

It is not clear what the next big app in Location Based Systems (LBS) will be. To add value to a customer experience it must enhance an existing behavior. Geotagging a picture might add value to a social network. The sensors are not yet accurate enough to track customers inside shopping areas to bring up ads in an augmented reality (AR).  Retailers can learn enough about clusters of customers to literally follow the herd and have products or services in their path. They want customers on Facebook and in their stores at the same time and only LBS can offer that.

I see privacy becoming a premium. The more money you have, the more invisible you can be. Despite the hype most people want their privacy and will want it back after it is violated. Most people will not have the time or be able to pay for opting out of LBS. If customers see no value in it, no business model can profit from it. It will take more than a coupon to get people adopt a service after a story about someone who does not want to be found is harmed. I think the next killer app will be to turn LBS off.

As for the larger CTIA event, attendance was light today. AT&T, Ericsson, Ford, Motorola and Samsung dominated the exhibition floor. A few Apple iPads were on display with the Samsung Galaxy. I saw Tony Sklar and and Ria Nielsen of bnetTV.com and other media interviewing new startups.

I wanted to mention Ford because it concerned me. Before there can be more mobile services in cars we will need auto-piloted vehicles. Hands-free operation phone does not mean the driver is paying full attention to the road.

There was an Android Bootcamp with experts like Kyle Sandler wearing green Android caps. I regret not covering a panel with mobile expert Joe Jasin, Stoyan Kenderov of Intuit, Rishi Mallik of Qik and Vidya Ravella of doubleTwist. At least I got a picture of them with David Cao of SVC Wireless.

There were also people protesting on the street outside about the dangers of cell phones. CTIA is counter-demonstrating by moving next year’s event to San Diego.

One thing I saw and wonder if anyone else at the event noticed it too. I saw many people on the street carrying more than one mobile device. Many had a phone and separate MP3 player. A few had a simple phone and were surfing WiFi with an iPad.

Copyright 2010 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Aug. 26, 2010 STC Social Media

On August 26, 2010 at Celia’s in Palo Alto, the STC Silicon Valley chapter hosted Vincent Lowe, co-founder of the nonprofit Transformation of Education and Schoolhouse Earth. His presentation was “Social Media and Your Career.” He talked about strategies, tips and techniques for making the most of Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and other social media.

Copyright 2010 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

May 25, 2010 SDF Social Networking

On May 25, 2010 in Redwood City at White & Lee LLP, SDForum held a workshop “Grow Your Career & Revenues with Social Media!” with Tim Bailey, President of Alliance-Strategies.

Bailey totally gets social networking. He understands it cannot be ignored and can be used to great advantage when communicating with customers. He talked about how social networks and strategies can work best for individuals and businesses using LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter. His advice has helped me connect and do business in a way I could not have imagined before.

Copyright 2010 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

May 12, 2010 Abel Adobe Acrolinx aQuatic

On May 12, 2010 in San Jose at Adobe, the fifth annual Acrolinx aQuatic Conference hosted Scott Abel, The Content Wrangler. His keynote was “Get Ready for Socially-Enabled Everything.” Social networking in Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter are becoming the dominant ways we interact with each other. We can now get accurate numbers on what people are looking at using tools like MarkMail and Tynt. Other speakers were Andrew Bredenkamp of Acrolinx, Mahesh Kumar Gupta of Adobe, Mike Dillinger on Translation Optimization and David Rodrigues of Language Weaver.

Copyright 2010 All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Mar. 16, 2010 SDF BI SIG: Web Analytics

SDF logo2009 copyKaushik Avinash copy

On March 16, 2010 in Palo Alto at SAP, SDForum’s Business Intelligence SIG hosted Google’s Avinash Kaushik presentation on “Web Analytics 2.0: Rethinking Decision Making in a 2.0 World.” Kaushik is the author of “Web Analytics: An Hour A Day” and winner of the 2009 Statistical Advocate of the Year award from the American Statistical Association. Text from DJCline.com

In the old days analysts could make a prediction and if it was wrong, they could always say they did not have enough data. Today software can record every keystroke and click on the web. The result is a lot of data, some information and very little wisdom. What is the point of gathering all this information if it cannot result in productive analysis and useful decision-making? Kaushik thinks not just about conversion rates but completion rates. Your analysis is not about how consumers behave online but offline. Statisticians must see the people behind the numbers. Any traffic analysis software will show you that more people might be visiting Facebook more than Google. The answers might lie beyond the statistics and more in the way people relate to one another. Text from DJCline.com

I think it interesting that with all the technology and information we have today we are still thrown back to the days of Socrates and trying to find out what is true with our reasoning skills. Web Analytics 2.0 may require Philosophy 1.0.

Be sure to check out SDForum’s big event called  “The Analytics Revolution” on Friday, April 9, 2010.

03-16-10 Kaushik copy03-16-10 Kaushik2 copy

Copyright 2010 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Nov. 12, 2009 SDF Deep Web

SDF logo2009 copyBhat Rajiv copyCoop Mike copyHalevy Alon copyHoffman Patricia copyMaata Jukka copyOlson Jodi copyRajaraman Anand copyShin Joe copySimmonds Barbara copySloboda Tilo copyTri Robert copy

On November 12, 2009 in Palo Alto at Cubberley Community Center, the SDForum Search SIG held “Google, Kosmix and the Exploration of the Deep Web” by Kosmix Co-Founder Dr. Anand Rajaraman and Dr. Alon Halevy of Google Labs. The Deep Web is the Internet not found by traditional search engines. This invisible web may be 500 times the size of what you see, made up of social networks, media-sharing sites for photos and videos, library catalogs, airline reservation systems, phone books, and scientific databases invisible to today’s search tools. Facebook, MySpace, and Twitter could provide whole new potentials for search. They think the Deep Web will change the business of search and discussed whether it will ever be fully exposed.

BTW: Mike Coop had a nice little Verizon Mi-Fi box that came in handy. His review can be seen at www.heycoop.com:

http://www.heycoop.com/2009/11/first-impressions-of-mifi.html

Thanks Coop!

TriRajaramanHalevy copy11-12-09 pan1 copySimmondBhatSloboda copyHoffmanMaata copyShinWang copy11-12-09 slide2 copy11-12-09 slide3 copy11-12-09 CoopVerizon copy

Copyright 2009 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Oct. 30, 2009 SDF Collaboration

SDF logo2009 copyAli Salim copyAshley Michael copyBaxi Nisha copyBonat Michelle copyBynum Roosevelt copyCarlier Robin copyCerullo Wayne copyChadna Asheem copyCohen Michael copyDatta Lokesh copyDea Donna copyFilev Andrew copyFreier Michael copyGanapathi Chuck copyGassko Igor copyGonzalez Jose copyHa Anthony copyHeiman Gil copyKing April copyKing David copyKumaran Ranjith copyLevie Aaron copyLundy James copyMarino Frank copyMayfield Ross copyMoretti Didier copyMoretti Didier copyMortilla Rose copyMurphy Irene copyNeedle David copyNema Prashant copyNielsen Dave 3 copyOMalley Dennis copyPlakias Mark copySingh Samantha copySriperumbuder Vamshi copyTeevens Perry copyTenster Ishay copyThompson Matt copyTsao Ted copyWallace Danny copyWalls Felisha copyWeinbar Sharon copyYu Harold copy

On October 30, 2009 at Techmart in Santa Clara, SDForum hosted “Collaboration 2.0: Collaborating in the Next Decade”. Using social media at work is collaboration. So many consumers are adopting and using social networking and web applications at home that it is starting to find its way into the workplace. Companies incorporate these new tools to improve productivity and combine disparate resources around the globe. They create content and build engaging communities. Online collaboration not only augments old ways of doing things, it improves mindshare, transparency, and creates a sense of community among coworkers. It adds value for customers and opportunities for new investment.

James Lundy of Gartner Research gave the opening keynote. He said the traditional IT structure is vulnerable and the users are out of control. It is the Wild West all over again.

Harold Yu of Orrick moderated panelists Salim Ali of SAP, Roosevelt Bynum of IBM, Chuck Ganapathi of Salesforce.com, Didier Moretti of Cisco Systems, Perry Teevens of Skype and Matt Thompson of Microsoft. They talked about “The Incumbent Perspective on Collaboration”. Big corporations are not only collaborating internally, they see it as they way to find and keep customers. Legacy IT systems must give way for the Facebook generation. If the IT department doesn’t keep up, employees and customers will bypass it.

Danny Wallace of PricewaterhouseCoopers held a fireside chat on “Use Case Study – Real Time Collaboration – End User Customer Perspective” with Prashant Nema of SVB Financial Group and Mark Plakias of Orange Labs. Unstructured collaboration allows free-flowing ideas between multiple parties. Plakias thinks of online collaboration as a low-cost, low-threshold way to round up research inputs.

Frank Marino of Frank Rimerman Consulting moderated panelists Michael Ashley of FastPencil, Ivan Koon of YouSendIt, Ross Mayfield of Socialtext and Aaron Levie of Box.net. They discussed “Emerging Talents that are Changing the Business Model – What’s the Next Big Thing?” When collaboration and technology create value, the money and talent follow. The average employee spends twenty percent of their week looking for information. Collaboration is dirty, until you allow people to argue, break rules, and mess things up, you won’t get innovation.

Anthony Ha of Venture Beat moderated venture capitalists Asheem Chandna of Greylock and Sharon Wienbar of Scale Venture Partners. They discussed “A Look at the Investment Landscape” You must get new customers within a certain period. This is a metric used to evaluate startups. Investors are looking for broad adoption even if the deal size is small. The “try before buy” model means software has to deliver quickly. Everyone is trying to figure out how to become the Twitter or Facebook for the enterprise when it will probably be Twitter and Facebook.

Chris Yeh of PBWorks moderated panelists Kailash Ambwani of FaceTime, Margaret Francis of Scout Labs, Ryan Holmes of HootSuite, Nanda Kishore of ShareThis and Seth Sternberg of Meebo. They discussed “Social Collaboration and the Consumer”. Collaboration is about people not technology. If you want to learn about collaboration start using the tools. Consumers will break down barriers to get what they want. You want to be there with a solution when it happens. Eighty percent of Generation Y use social networking for both business and personal use already. Privacy and security are big concerns. Social media is not like Vegas, what happens on Facebook, doesn’t actually stay on Facebook. Chris Yeh said a collaboration tool only works if it helps people do more and not get in the way.

10-30-09 crowd1 copy10-30-09 panel1 copy10-30-09 panel2 copy10-30-09 panel3 copy10-30-09 panel4 copy10-30-09 Agilisteam copy10-30-09 dynnoteam copy10-30-09 BonatTregoning copy10-30-09 NielsenLucas copy10-30-09 WeinbarNeedleLucas copy10-30-09 pitchers copy

Copyright 2009 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Sept. 24, 2009 STC Andrew Davis LinkUp

STClogonew1Davis Andrew copy09-24-09 crowd copy

On September 24, 2009 in Mountain View at the Dojo House, STC Silicon Valley hosted Andrew Davis of LinkUp to talk about what’s next in technical communication. Whatever you are doing now, it is time to do something else. You have to create profits for your clients or you won’t have any. Don’t be middle management.  Be so good, so unique you cannot be offshored. Become the subject matter expert that clients want to talk to. Text from DJCline.com

Davis recommended business strategies that I’ve seen work elsewhere:

1. Identify an underserved audience in a prosperous industry with good long-term prospects (e.g., not snow sports or clean coal, but maybe healthcare, medical devices, or clean tech)

2. Acquire deep subject-matter expertise

3. Develop a respected, and responsive, professional network

4. Cultivate a role as trusted intermediary between seller and buyer

5. Provide a proprietary standalone product or service – such as training, support, recruiting, advertising, marketing, mediation, testing, or even documentation – with which you deliver unique profit-making potential to your customer. Try to make your solution synergistic, and don’t stop refining it.

6. Connect with both buyers and sellers, and dig deep for ways to make them both more financially successful.

7. Market your results in ways that resonate with ‘money people.’ Address the CFO’s concerns.

After the formal meeting Andrew also spoke to me about LinkUp which is not LinkedIn. LinkUp helps companies list jobs that are not normally advertised.  Companies can post a position and find qualified candidates. He explained to me why LinkUp made sense for companies looking to actually hire people. In a nutshell, here is what sets LinkUp apart (from the employer’s perspective): Text from DJCline.com

1. Indexes jobs only from employers’ websites, and freshens them daily — its listings are always current, never fake, and usually unadvertised anywhere else. Result: candidates can confidently spend more time focused on your opportunities.

2. Carries no listings from recruiters, job boards, or aggregators. No middleman or advertising fees means candidates cost you less.

3. Publicizes all your jobs for less than the price of 2 postings on the major ‘pay-to-post’ job boards.

4. Offers a custom career portal, if you lack your own applicant-tracking system (ATS).

5. Brings candidates directly to your site, making them ATS-trackable and easier to inform.

6. Syndicates your job listings to Facebook and Twitter, solving your social-network distribution challenges.

7. Offers sponsored ads for $0.25/click — 1/8th the cost of Indeed, Simply Hired, and Google. Plus, you’re not bidding against the job boards as you would be on the aggregators.

8. Makes jobs ultra-accessible via the LinkUp iPhone app, blog widget, custom RSS feeds, email agents, Twitter, and Facebook app.

9. Carries almost 400,000 jobs from over 22,000 employers nationally, including all the Fortune 500 — at least 3 times more listings than The Ladders and Employment Crossing, and 8 times more than DICE.

10. August 2009 stats: 151,223 visits / 113,608 unique / average time on site 4:22 minutes. Text from DJCline.com

Copyright 2009 DJ Cline All right reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Aug. 6, 2009 SDF doubleTwist

SDF logo2009 copyFarantzos Monique copyJasin Joe copyJohansen JonLech copyLam Peter copyWeber Goetz copy

On August 6, 2009 in Menlo Park at the Orrick campus, SDForum’s Mobile SIG hosted the leaders of doubleTwist, CEO Monique Farantzos, CTO Jon Lech Johansen and COO Goetz Weber.

Their presentation focused on distribution of digital media and the concepts of open vs. closed ecosystems. What is going on between Apple and doubleTwist? What are the trends in moving content across platforms? Can content move easily between Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and your TV, laptop and cell phone? The platform doubleTwist presents is an open framework for new kinds of messaging.

They have had some success in Japan. Customers use their software to download content onto their cell phones and share it with family and friends. The software can be bundled with SD chips or other media and loaded onto almost any mobile device.

They are up to something. Stay tuned or even iTuned.

08-06-09 DTslide19 copy08-06-09 DTslide20 copy08-06-09 DTslide21 copy08-06-09 DTslide22 copy

Copyright 2009 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

July 9, 2009 SDF Social Networking

SDForum copy.jpgbailey-tim-copykanakamedala-sam-copysupplee-ward-copywalker-jules-copywright-ben-copy

On July 9, 2009 at White & Lee LLP in Redwood City SDForum hosted Tim Bailey, President of Alliance-Strategies. Bailey’s presentation was “Social Networking Increases Your Opportunities”.

Before diving into social networking, listen to Bailey. He says social networking is too big for companies and individuals to ignore and there are ways to make the most of it. Think about your brand’s short term and long-term strategy. Who is your audience and what do you want to tell them? What are your strengths and weaknesses?

The most important social networking phenomena are LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter. Bailey went through each of them discussing their advantages and disadvantages. LinkedIn is for professionals. Facebook is less formal and more personal. Twitter is wild and still forming. After carefully assessing them, start slowly building your network on the people and companies you know and trust. He thinks you can spend about a half hour a day maintaining it. Keep it honest and fun and people will want to get involved.

Social networking is so huge a topic that it needs at least a one-day seminar just to cover the highlights. The large audience had lots of questions that Bailey tried to answer as succinctly as possible in two short hours. I look forward to hearing more from him on this subject.

whiteleebldg-copy07-08-09-sdf-crowd1-copy

Copyright 2009 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Apr. 22, 2009 SDF Facebook Cassandra

SDForum copy.jpglakshman-avinash-copy.jpgmalik-prashant-copy.jpg

On April 22, 2009 in Palo Alto, SDForum’s SAM SIG hosted engineers Avinash Lakshman and Prashant Malik. Lakshman came from Amazon and Malik from Microsoft. Together they are working on something they call the Cassandra Project at Facebook.

Cassandra is a distributed storage system for managing structured data designed to scale to a very large size across many commodity servers, with no single point of failure. Reliability at massive scale is a very big challenge. Outages in service can have significant negative impact. Cassandra runs on top of an infrastructure of hundreds of nodes (possibly spread across different data centers). At this scale, small and large components can fail continuously. Cassandra manages the persistent state in the face of these failures driving the reliability and scalability of the software systems relying on this service. Cassandra achieves the goals of scalability, high performance, high availability and applicability. It shares many design and implementation strategies with databases. Cassandra does not support a full relational data model but provides clients with a simple data model that supports dynamic control over data layout and format.

04-22-09-sdf-sigmen-copy.jpg

Copyright 2009 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

June 4, 2008 SDF Grassroots IT

SDForum copy.jpg06-04-08-efrusywong-copy.jpg06-04-08-fireside1-copy.jpg06-04-08-panel1-copy.jpg06-04-08-fireside2-copy.jpg06-04-08-panel2-copy.jpg06-04-08-panel3-copy.jpg06-04-08-fireside3-copy.jpg06-04-08-crowd2-copy.jpg

On June 4, 2008 at Cooley Godward Kronish in Palo Alto, SDForum and Accel presented “The Consumerization of Software”. Susan Lucas-Conwell of SDForum and Kevin Efrusy of Accel welcomed the large crowd to talk about the big shift in adopting technology. Text from DJCline.com. Continue reading June 4, 2008 SDF Grassroots IT

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

May 13, 2008 SDF Teen Tech 2

SDForum copy.jpgagrawal-athias-copy.jpgalexander-deanna-copy.jpgbajarin-ben-copy.jpgbolwell-andrew-copy.jpgbraccia-andrew-copy.jpgbrackeen-debra-copy.jpgbrusilovsky-daniel-copy.jpgchoudhary-anirudh-copy.jpgdeglin-george-copy.jpgdonohue-stacy-copy.jpgescobedo-richard-copy.jpgfranusic-joel-copy.jpggibbs-mike-copy.jpggibbs-peggy-copy.jpgha-oanh-copy.jpghathi-sekal-copy.jpghoffman-steve-copy.jpgirwin-jeff-copy.jpgjoh-jae-copy.jpgkamrin-ameer-copy.jpgkapur-ravi-copy.jpgkarras-jeff-copy.jpgkazerooni-mazy-copy.jpgkobylarz-constance-copy.jpgkumar-shooby-copy.jpgleopoldtilley-allison-copy.jpglevide-cliff-copy.jpglevine-drew-copy.jpglevy-mitchell-copy.jpglewin-jd-copy.jpglibova-alina-copy.jpgliddle-daniel-copy.jpglindsay-jeff-copy.jpglodha-surahbi-copy.jpgmagid-larry-copy.jpgmonsalve-sergio-copy.jpgnoguchi-sharon-copy.jpgoishi-lindsay-copy.jpgolson-stephanie-copy.jpgosborn-jon-copy.jpgpande-mani-copy.jpgpelton-charles-copy.jpgpetersson-viktor-copy.jpgpriyanka-bhatia-copy.jpgrodhe-karen-copy.jpgsakai-john-copy.jpgsamar-anshul-copy.jpgsamar-vipin-copy.jpgshalavi-alex-copy.jpgsiebert-jeff-copy.jpgsmith-adam-copy.jpgsmith-whitney-copy.jpgstock-elizabeth-copy.jpgstrange-angela-copy.jpgthompson-matt-copy.jpgtruong-salina-copy.jpgvan-diggelen-alison-copy.jpgwilde-jonathan-copy.jpgwu-elaine-copy.jpg

On May 13, 2008 at HP in Palo Alto, SDForum held it’s second annual Teen Tech event. NPR, the San Jose Mercury News and CBS 60 Minutes covered this year’s bigger event.

One way to see the future is to meet the people who will be living in it. The Teen Tech event is a good way to see what the next fifty years will be like. Teens connect with each other while moving through physical and virtual space using voice, video, text messaging and games. Teens are moving beyond social networking to building businesses with each other. The question is not what technology teens will buy but what technology they will sell to the rest of us.

SDForum’s CEO Susan Lucas-Conwell and HP’s Debra Brackeen kicked off the event by introducing Anshul Samar of Alchemist Empire. Samar created a game where chemical elements and compounds become essentially action figures with particular properties. It has sold thousands of copies around the world.

Stephanie Olsen of Cnet moderated the High School panel with Deanna Alexander, Priyanka Bhatia, Sekal Hathi and Jonathan Wilde. Teens seldom watch TV but do watch YouTube. It would be nice to see a new episode on a big TV. They listen to music from iTunes and movies on Netflix and search for reviews on Google. They spend six hours a day on the laptops doing homework, reading and e-mailing because it can reach teachers, relatives or potential employers outside their age group. Students want teachers to create consistent user interfaces with lectures online and interactive whiteboards for online classes.

While they have no trouble learning new technical skills they still want to work on their real world social skills. Facebook is more popular and less complicated than MySpace. Most smart phones are not as smart as the iPhone. They want GPS, decent video and calendars interfaces that are easier to use. Like their parents, they are very concerned about privacy and safety. They are more likely to participate in causes online than their parents.

Allison Leopold Tilley of Pillsbury Winthrop moderated the second panel with Steve Hoffman of ROCKETON, JD Lewin of Microsoft, Matt Thompson of Sun, and Ameer Karim of HP. Millennials are so adept at new technology that their parents ask them for technical advice. They see teens more mobile, more virtual and more likely to use or develop open source applications. They are also more fickle and likely to drop a brand or technology if something better comes along. They have to see value before buying.

Online games are attracting millions of players usually by personal recommendations. Games designed by teens will be played by teens. They want to be able to create and control their online identities across platforms. They want to have their Grand Theft Auto avatar on their Facebook account.

Karen Rohde of SUN talked with Mani Pande of Institute for the Future about teens in the workforce. To attract talent companies will need to use blogs, wikis, instant messaging and texting. Teens multitask and will text message each other while in a meeting. They are more likely to communicate and collaborate. If they don’t know something they will search and find someone who does. They expect flexible schedules and are seeking mentors to plan their careers.

Salina Truong of Gumball Capital spoke about her early desire to do good. As a child she wanted to buy a third world country. As a teen she sold Rubik’s Cubes and snacks and moved on to selling affiliate software on eBay. Now she works with Kiva.org to encourage micro lending around the world.

Larry Magid of CBS moderated the College panel with George Deglin of Berkeley, Jae Joh of Stanford, Mazy Kazerooni of Ustream, Alina Libova of Cal Poly, Jon Osborn of Santa Clara and Jeff Siebert of Stanford. They don’t watch TV or read newspapers. College students still use e-mail and carry laptops. About half the laptops at Stanford are Apple. Upper class students want smart phones that can surf the web like the iPhone or Blackberry. Other kids use basic cell phones and Microsoft Windows. Both groups look for music groups with MySpace. They use Facebook, Salesforce and Google Groups to keep track of friends or contacts. Teens will content as long as there are no strings attached like DRM. They want cell phones that vibrate and text message on faster networks. They like iTunes, Crunchgear, TechCrunch and Woot.com. They want better aggregation and interoperability in software applications. All of this technology makes it easier for them to be more socially and politically active.

Ben Bajrin of Creative Strategies moderated the Investor panel with Andrew Braccia of Accel, Sergio Monsalve of Norwest Venture Partners and Angela Strange of Bay Partners. Despite the current downturn investors and teens know the economy is cyclical and it will turn around. Bad investors and investments stay out of a down market and it is easier to see through the clutter. High energy costs will force the next generation to redesign where they live, work and play. Their technology choices will percolate through society and show up in other age groups. The opportunities are in mobile, content and branding. Right now there is no way for a teen to buy online without a credit card. That is an opportunity, and not just for teens. Fee or subscription models are vulnerable to advertising driven free content models. While they look for opportunities to invest in teen entrepreneurs they still want them to continue their educations.

Richard Escobedo of Teens in Tech spoke about his interest in entrepreneurship from age of seven until his present age of fourteen. He learned to be resourceful, seek help when necessary and to persevere. He started a podcast for teens and uses Twitter, WordPress, Apple and Final Cut Express video. Beyond technology he plays football and the violin.

Courtney Macavinta of Respectrx moderated the Teen Entrepreneurs with Drew Levine, Shooby Kumar and Daniel Brusilovsky. One factor in becoming a young entrepreneur is growing up in a family that values technology and entrepreneurship. They see lower barriers of entry in starting a business, with a great demand for video content.

Non-profits are inspiring teens too. Whitney Smith talked about the Girls for a Change that uses technology to build networks for girls in poor neighborhoods. Elizabeth Stock of Computers for Youth spoke of making learning fun and relevant in ways outside traditional education. Joel Franusic and Adam Smith of SuperHappyDevHouse invited teens to their big open source event at Sun Microsystems Menlo Park campus the next weekend.

Note: Forest Grove OR 8-29-17

Copyright 2008 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Apr. 15, 2008 SDF VC PWC

SDForum copy.jpgbengston-steve2-copy.jpgbaharav-ofer-copy.jpgblake-richard-copy.jpgburks-sylvia-copy.jpggerhardt-dania-copy.jpggerhardt-gregory-copy.jpgkinzelberg-chad-copy.jpgleckie-lars-copy.jpgmezak-steve-copy.jpgmiller-adam-copy.jpgminer-allan-copy.jpgomalley-brian-copy.jpgomalley-brian-copy.jpgperez-matt-copy.jpgpichinson-martin-copy.jpgrath-holger-copy.jpgschmelter-ralf-copy.jpgsmith-david-copy.jpgspector-yuval-copy.jpgstedman-chris-copy.jpgunnamatla-sree-copy.jpgvaldez-christie-copy.jpgvernetti-amy-copy.jpgwang-gigi-copy.jpgwhitman-michael-copy.jpgwong-richard-face.jpgzapf-lars-copy.jpg

On Tuesday, January 15, 2008 in Palo Alto at Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP and SDForum held the fifth quarterly Venture Breakfast Series in partnership with PWC. Text stolen from DJCline.com. Continue reading Apr. 15, 2008 SDF VC PWC

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS