Tag Archives: augmented reality

Sep. 16, 2013 STC Marta Rauch Google Glass

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On Monday September 16, 2013 at the Santa Clara IHOP, the STC Silicon Valley Chapter hosted Marta Rauch’s presentation “Google Glass and Augmented Reality.” Rauch is a senior principal information developer at Oracle leading agile projects for mobile and cloud content. She is Google Glass Explorer thinks it is an extension of the trends in augmented reality (AR). AR is the single most important change in technical communication this century. It allows images and video to overlay and add relevant information to anything you are looking at.

Anything you can do on your phone you are able to do with Google Glass. The advantages of hands-free wireless device is obvious to athletes, surgeons, technicians, mechanics and the disabled will become apparent to the rest of us over time. Navigating cyberspace and real space at the same time will seem normal.

There are also disadvantages at the moment. Battery life and network availability problems plague every wireless device. The Google Glass does not easily accommodate real glasses or those who are left handed. There are unresolved privacy issues for individuals and employers. In the end we will all have to get used to the idea of a phones on our faces.

Richard Mateosian announced the start of the Touchstone Competition. The deadline is October 15, 2013. I encourage volunteering as a judge to see some of the best examples of technical communication in the world.

Please join us on Monday, October 21 at 6:00 pm for our October meeting with Tom Johnson on the topic “Why Users Can’t Find Answers to Their Questions in Help Content.” It will be held at: Harry’s Hofbrau, 1909 El Camino Real in Redwood City CA 94063 (650) 366-3733.

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Copyright 2013 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

 

Nov. 15, 2011 Tech Museum Test Zone

On Tuesday November 15, 2011 in San Jose, the Tech Museum opened “Test Zone 2011: Interfaces of the New Decade”. The event brought together innovative interactive technology researchers, developers, and users to get a hands-on look at new ways to experience museums and public spaces. The Test Zone displayed examples of augmented reality, context awareness, deformable surfaces, eye-tracking, gestural interfaces, gigapixel images, motion sensing, multi-touch, natural user interfaces, RFIDs, smart museum systems, tablet computers and ubiquitous media.

Bob Ketner of the Tech Museum was the master of ceremonies. Tech Museum president Tim Ritchie unveiled the Tech Virtual and Tech Test Zone where new exhibit ideas are tried out. Christopher Stapleton of Simiosys talked about how “phydgital space” will be the next generation of user experience.  Ana Rosario of Intel spoke of the key players in the augmented reality space. Ross Smith of University of South Australia talked about sculpting with a digital interface. John MacDuffie Woodburn and Matt Miller of Pixel demonstrated eye tracking software. Tamara Schwartz of the Chabot Space & Science Center showed how exhibits with RFIDs interact with users. Rick Ernst of Ogmento uses augmented reality games to get people off their couches. Sasha Harris-Cronin of BBI Engineering talked about the risks and rewards of new technologies in museums. Jim Spadaccini of Open Exhibits demonstrated community software for multitouch and motion recognition.

Also attending were museum supporters Ann Bowers and Barbara Glynn.

 

Copyright 2011 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Oct. 13, 2010 SDF IQ Engines

On October 13, 2010 in Palo Alto at Pillsbury Winthrop, the SDForum Emerging Technology SIG hosted Gerry Pesavento, CEO and Co-Founder of IQ Engines and Pierre Garrigues, Director of Research and Development. They talked about “Trends in Visual Intelligence.”

They explained how their image recognition engine takes advantage of human crowd sourcing from the millions of mobile devices taking billions of pictures everyday around the world. If someone takes a picture and they do not tag it with identifying data about the content, the camera merely assigns the images a number, which does not help much.

Pesavento said “The mobile camera is evolving to an ‘intelligent visual sensor’ to power mobile visual search, vision for the blind, photo labeling and augmented reality.” IQ Engines is sorting through images from mobile devices is a user driven strategy of working from images that people are already interested in rather large libraries of stock images. Putting human recognition in a real-time loop to assist machine learning dramatically speeds up the accuracy of recognizing images. The better a person identifies the image, the higher their ranking. The key is their scalable any-image recognition engine. All this easier with the growth of the cloud, new database and analytics tools.

The most interesting development to me will be the new high definition three-dimensional digital cameras. Soon many mobile devices will have two cameras to give the kind images reminiscent of stereo-optic images from the 1800s or Viewmaster images from the 1900s. Until then I will have to take two pictures of the same stationary object a few inches apart and process them together later. (Now you know why I do that funny move when I take your picture. Always thinking ahead.)

Copyright 2010 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

October 8, 2010 CTIA WCA LBS

On October 8, 2010 in San Francisco at Moscone West, WCA hosted a session at CTIA Enterprise & Applicationsâ„¢ entitled “What’s Hot About LBS?” Philip E. Hendrix of immr and GigaOM moderated panelists Lawrence Coburn of Double Dutch, Laura Diaz of Verizon Wireless, Ian Heidt of Qualcomm, Larry Magid of CBS, Eghosa Omoigui an independent venture capitalist, Sanjaya Krishna of KPMG, and Rob Reed of MomentFeed.

It is not clear what the next big app in Location Based Systems (LBS) will be. To add value to a customer experience it must enhance an existing behavior. Geotagging a picture might add value to a social network. The sensors are not yet accurate enough to track customers inside shopping areas to bring up ads in an augmented reality (AR).  Retailers can learn enough about clusters of customers to literally follow the herd and have products or services in their path. They want customers on Facebook and in their stores at the same time and only LBS can offer that.

I see privacy becoming a premium. The more money you have, the more invisible you can be. Despite the hype most people want their privacy and will want it back after it is violated. Most people will not have the time or be able to pay for opting out of LBS. If customers see no value in it, no business model can profit from it. It will take more than a coupon to get people adopt a service after a story about someone who does not want to be found is harmed. I think the next killer app will be to turn LBS off.

As for the larger CTIA event, attendance was light today. AT&T, Ericsson, Ford, Motorola and Samsung dominated the exhibition floor. A few Apple iPads were on display with the Samsung Galaxy. I saw Tony Sklar and and Ria Nielsen of bnetTV.com and other media interviewing new startups.

I wanted to mention Ford because it concerned me. Before there can be more mobile services in cars we will need auto-piloted vehicles. Hands-free operation phone does not mean the driver is paying full attention to the road.

There was an Android Bootcamp with experts like Kyle Sandler wearing green Android caps. I regret not covering a panel with mobile expert Joe Jasin, Stoyan Kenderov of Intuit, Rishi Mallik of Qik and Vidya Ravella of doubleTwist. At least I got a picture of them with David Cao of SVC Wireless.

There were also people protesting on the street outside about the dangers of cell phones. CTIA is counter-demonstrating by moving next year’s event to San Diego.

One thing I saw and wonder if anyone else at the event noticed it too. I saw many people on the street carrying more than one mobile device. Many had a phone and separate MP3 player. A few had a simple phone and were surfing WiFi with an iPad.

Copyright 2010 DJ Cline All rights reserved.