Tag Archives: AT&T

Aug. 7, 2017 The New Yorker

Aug. 7, 2017 The New Yorker’s Sheelah Kolhatkar wrote “Bad Ratings” about cable companies outrageous price increases and terrible customer service. The major companies are AT&T, CenturyLink, Comcast, Spectrum, and Verizon. They are effectively monopolies controlling the speed and access to the Internet. Ajit Pai, formerly of Verizon was appointed FCC Chairman by Donald Trump. He wants to  end Net Neutrality, an important First Amendment right that would give complete censorship control to these companies.

Benjamin Wallace Wells wrote “The Dream Deferred” about Bernie Sanders continuing his campaigns for healthcare, education, housing, and fair wages.

Copyright 2017 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Jun. 12, 2013 IEEE AT&T

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On June 12, 2013 in Santa Clara at Texas Instruments, the Silicon Valley chapter of the IEEE hosted AT&T’s Shiyama Clunie of External Affairs, Michael Caniglia of Mobility and Jacob Saperstein of Public Affairs.  They explained how AT&T is expanding its network capacity to meet growing demand. They also talked about their Palo Alto Foundry which gives innovators access to AT&T’s massive resources to develop new technologies and services. They also brought some unusual attachments for an Apple iPhone.

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Copyright 2013 DJ Cline All rights received.

Feb. 10, 2013 Blumbers

Phone Photos

I learned that John E. Karlin, Designer of the 20th Century Telephone, Dies at 94.

I created some squares of telephones. I have no trouble finding phones from 1900, but it seems impossible to find a cell phone from 1990. Doug Wray saw the pictures and noticed how little the form factor changed. I wonder if there are any lessons to be applied to wireless devices?

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Copyright 2013 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

October 8, 2010 CTIA WCA LBS

On October 8, 2010 in San Francisco at Moscone West, WCA hosted a session at CTIA Enterprise & Applicationsâ„¢ entitled “What’s Hot About LBS?” Philip E. Hendrix of immr and GigaOM moderated panelists Lawrence Coburn of Double Dutch, Laura Diaz of Verizon Wireless, Ian Heidt of Qualcomm, Larry Magid of CBS, Eghosa Omoigui an independent venture capitalist, Sanjaya Krishna of KPMG, and Rob Reed of MomentFeed.

It is not clear what the next big app in Location Based Systems (LBS) will be. To add value to a customer experience it must enhance an existing behavior. Geotagging a picture might add value to a social network. The sensors are not yet accurate enough to track customers inside shopping areas to bring up ads in an augmented reality (AR).  Retailers can learn enough about clusters of customers to literally follow the herd and have products or services in their path. They want customers on Facebook and in their stores at the same time and only LBS can offer that.

I see privacy becoming a premium. The more money you have, the more invisible you can be. Despite the hype most people want their privacy and will want it back after it is violated. Most people will not have the time or be able to pay for opting out of LBS. If customers see no value in it, no business model can profit from it. It will take more than a coupon to get people adopt a service after a story about someone who does not want to be found is harmed. I think the next killer app will be to turn LBS off.

As for the larger CTIA event, attendance was light today. AT&T, Ericsson, Ford, Motorola and Samsung dominated the exhibition floor. A few Apple iPads were on display with the Samsung Galaxy. I saw Tony Sklar and and Ria Nielsen of bnetTV.com and other media interviewing new startups.

I wanted to mention Ford because it concerned me. Before there can be more mobile services in cars we will need auto-piloted vehicles. Hands-free operation phone does not mean the driver is paying full attention to the road.

There was an Android Bootcamp with experts like Kyle Sandler wearing green Android caps. I regret not covering a panel with mobile expert Joe Jasin, Stoyan Kenderov of Intuit, Rishi Mallik of Qik and Vidya Ravella of doubleTwist. At least I got a picture of them with David Cao of SVC Wireless.

There were also people protesting on the street outside about the dangers of cell phones. CTIA is counter-demonstrating by moving next year’s event to San Diego.

One thing I saw and wonder if anyone else at the event noticed it too. I saw many people on the street carrying more than one mobile device. Many had a phone and separate MP3 player. A few had a simple phone and were surfing WiFi with an iPad.

Copyright 2010 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Mar. 4, 2010 SDF Wedbush and MoSoNex

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On Thursday March 4, 2010 in Palo Alto at Nokia, the SDForum Mobile SIG hosted “Digital Media End-User Demographics and Generations” to discuss mobile consumption and distribution in the current mobile markets. The convergence of digital media in telecommunications and the Internet is spreading to all age groups and across international boundaries. Text from DJCline.com

Scott Sutherland, Managing Director of Technology Investments at Wedbush gave one of the best snapshots of the mobile industry so far. There are seven billion people on the planet, five billion have cell phones and one billion have Internet access. Mobile devices are now the dominant computing platform on the planet displacing desktop or laptop computers. The mobile market is fragmented by carriers, manufacturers and regulation. Companies that control hardware, software, content and the distribution network will eventually marginalize this crowded field. Text from DJCline.com

Who will dominate? Carriers jealously control access to get their percentage of texting and video. Hardware and software players push for proprietary standards. Content developers try to guard their content with DRM. Each of these controls only a part of the mobile market. Apple controls every aspect of the customer experience except the network it must get from carriers like AT&T. Google controls software with Android and arguably access to content, but does not control the hardware or network. The growth of WiFi could bypass the carriers entirely. The winners will be those who can dramatically simplify the situation for users. Text from DJCline.com

Gurminder Singh, Ph.D. CTO and COO of MoSoNex has devised such a solution. He wanted to send family pictures from America to his mother in India. He sent them to a relative’s cell phone living in the same house as his mother. While it took seconds to send the pictures half way around the world it took a month to transfer the pictures from a cell phone to a TV. Text from DJCline.com

MoSoNex has figured out how to simplify this process. You set up a friends and family network with all the players identified for easy access. You can then take a picture with your cell phone and send it to your grandmother. She can watch it on her iPTV or any other device like another cell phone. He also understands the broader implications of sending this beyond family and friends. I think you could make the group as large as you want and become a one man CNN by charging subscribers or selling ads. Text from DJCline.com

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Copyright 2010 DJ Cline All rights reserved.