Tag Archives: Apple

Feb. 5, 2017 Blumbers

Citizen Status Symbol

On Jan. 29, 2017, Bloomberg’s Peter Elstrom and Saritha Rai wrote “Trump’s Next Immigration Move to Hit Closer to Home for Tech” about the new administration’s immigration restrictions on high tech workers. It affected Infosys, TCS, Tech Mahindra and Wipro’s ability to supply cheap H1B labor to Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google, Salesforce, Microsoft and Twitter. “Ron Hira, an associate professor at Howard University, who has done extensive research on the subject, points out workers at outsourcers are typically not treated as well as others. The median wage at outsourcing firms for H-1B workers was less than $70,000, while Apple, Google and Microsoft paid their employees in the program more than $100,000, according to data he collected. That suggests the American companies are going after true, highly skilled employees, while the outsourcers are recruiting less expensive talent, he said.”

On Jan. 31, 2017, The New Republic’s Clio Chang wrote “Silicon Valley’s Uneasy Muslim Ban Dance” about Silicon Valley’s reaction to the new restrictions. “Within the structure of American capitalism, the average tech CEO has more in common with a billionaire like Donald Trump than with the average immigrant worker or refugee. That many of them continue to find ways to work with Trump and to undercut protests to protect their profits should come as no surprise. Trump is ushering in a plutocratic era that requires us to demand the most from those in powerful positions; to do so, we must first shed the assumption that Silicon Valley is on the side of the people.”

Quietly many tech executives are furious. They helped get the president elected hoping they would not have to pay taxes. The money they thought they would make may have to go toward hiring US citizens at market rates. Citizens also have an advantage because they have no travel restrictions as there might be with visas or green cards. Foreign workers who are captive in a way that even Frederick Douglass would be concerned but U.S. citizens can just walk across the street. You know, all that free market stuff conservatives talk about, until they need help.

Copyright 2017 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Feb. 6, 2016 Apple Problems

Something is happening at Apple. CEO Tim Cook said that iPhone sales were slowing. On Feb. 3, 2016 The Verge’s Walt Mossberg wrote “Apple’s apps need work Complexity, feature gaps, and bugs have crept in” about the company’s software lagging behind its hardware design. On Jan. 28, 2016 The Guardian’s Nellie Bowles, wrote “Apple – losing out on talent and in need of a killer new device” about software developers not wanting to work for Apple. On Feb. 1, 2016 Bloomberg’s Jack Clark wrote “Google Parent Overtakes Apple as World’s Most Valuable Company” about Alphabet’s market capitalization reaching $531 billion over Apple’s $523.9 billion.

Lately I have noticed recruiters desperately trying to place anyone at Apple. I know some amazing technical people who will not even talk to them. They say Apple does not pay enough to live in Silicon Valley. They do not like the pressure cooker culture. People inside are cautiously reaching out, looking for new opportunities. Some are contemplating selling their homes.

This does not jive with Apple continuing to build its mothership or recently announcing it is getting more office space in San Jose. What is going on? We might find out at their next big event on Mar. 15, 2016.

Copyright 2016 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Nov. 10, 2015 H1B Workers Underpaid

On Nov. 9, 2015 Wendy Lee of the San Francisco Chronicle wrote a story about H1B workers being underpaid. The US Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour division’s assistant district director Michael Eastwood revealed a federal judge ordered Scopus Consulting Group and Orian Engineers to pay $84,000 in back wages and $103,000 in fines. “In one case a worker earned $5,000 a month when the worker should have been paid $5,900 a month.” This is about an fifteen per cent cut in what are commonly already underpaid H1B positions. Many of the 85,000 workers are afraid to speak out. Apple, eBay, Cisco or other companies using Scopus or Orian have not responded to this article. Silicon Valley is an expensive place to live. Degreed professionals should be paid for their extraordinary skills no matter where they are from.

Copyright 2015 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Feb. 22, 2015 Blumbers

Apple iCar

There are rumors that Apple, Amazon and Tesla are developing robocars. Frankly, this cannot happen soon enough. Traffic in Silicon Valley is so bad that drivers cannot text or talk on the phone. They should not even listen to the radio. Just keep your eyes on the road and your hands on the wheel.

Here is a top ten list if Apple starts selling cars:

1. The stores are going to have to be bigger.

2. The car will require a special set of wrenches to open it.

3. There will be only one USB port to charge it.

4. You will have to buy a black vinyl cover for it to keep clean like Porsche’s from the 1990s.

5. If you are in an accident, you will have to exchange IP Addresses and call Apple Care.

6. The most expensive model will be gold plated. The cheapest model will be available in a range of colors.

7. It will be so thin most people will not be able to fit inside.

8. If the car is stolen Siri will lock the doors and drive to the nearest police station.

9. If you fall behind in your car payments, Siri will lock the doors and drive to the nearest police station.

10. Critics will still say Steve Jobs would have made a better one.

Copyright 2015 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Aug. 9, 2014 Doug Menuez Fearless Genius

On August 9, 2014 in Mountain View, the Computer History Museum exhibited “Fearless Genius: The Digital Revolution in Silicon Valley 1985-2000.” This collection is just a sample of the 250,000 images taken by photojournalist Doug Menuez taken during that period.

Thirty years ago, Steve Jobs was kicked out of Apple, an organization he had helped build. It did not stop him. He created Next computers. The genius of Steve Jobs was bringing out the genius of others and making the most of it. He recognized the talents of Doug Menuez from his images in newspapers and magazines. Jobs gave him complete access. He did not tell the photographer what cameras to use or who to take pictures of. The result was a series of remarkable historic images capturing the people who changed the world.

Menuez sees a bigger picture from all the little ones. There is a trend from open, inclusive cultures based on sharing to closed, exclusive cultures based on greed and exploitation. Organizations that used to meet in community college classrooms now meet in gated mansions. While this might create jobs in other countries, it does not help most people in America. Without middle class jobs there are few paths to success for the next Steve Jobs.

We owe a debt to people like Menuez who had the foresight to take these images. Imagine if you had an independent photojournalist who was willing to accurately document every important event in your organization. Of course, you would have credit their work and they could make money from the images in magazines etc. but the publicity and legacy it would promote would be worth it.

Real visionaries show us what they see. If history is written by the winners, it is also photographed. This exhibit is an inspiration to archive and display my own collection of Silicon Valley history.

Copyright 2014 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

 

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

May 5, 2014 Bloomberg Businessweek

On May 5, 2014 Bloomberg Businessweek Paul M. Barrett and Brad Stone wrote “Tech Hubris” about a Silicon Valley antitrust case handled by US District Judge Lucy Koh. Lawyers of 64,000 technical employees accused Adobe, Apple, Google, Intel, Intuit, Lucasfilm and Pixar of conspiring to keep wages down and keep them from moving from one company to another. Google’s Eric Schmidt said “I don’t want to create a paper trail over which we can be sued later.” The companies agreed to pay 324 million dollars. Elevation Partners’ Roger McNamee said “This is one of hundreds of examples in which our economy has been corrupted by the intense concentration of power and wealth.” It seems odd that CEOs who glorify free market competition would want to keep their workers benefitting from it the same way they do.

Copyright 2014 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Mar. 4, 2013 The New Yorker

On Mar. 4, 2013 The New Yorker‘s James Surowiecki wrote “Eyeing Apple” about how experts predict Apple’s demise in spite of its continued success. It succeeds because it does  things other companies either cannot or decide not to do.

Louis Menand wrote “How The Deal Went Down” about how the President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s New Deal saved democracy. FDR was so unpopular among the one percent that he was re-elected four times.

Copyright 2013 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

2013 Top Ten Predictions

1. North Korea stages a Gangnam style demonstration with one million people that can be seen from space.

2. The Fiscal Cliff will be followed by a Cliff Huxtable, where politicians will have to wear ugly sweaters and rhapsodize about pudding.

3. It will be revealed that Apple’s gorilla glass is made by real gorillas.

4. To continue expansion, Facebook will reach an agreement with Ancestry.com to begin creating accounts for dead relatives. Instagram will add an oil painting filter.

5. Amazon will offer a rare collection of Philip K. Dick’s laundry and grocery lists on Kindle Fire only. The lists will be turned into movies. “Rye Bread And Cheese” will win an Oscar for special effects.

6. California will allow drivers to text, but only to really attractive people.

7. Texas will allow drivers to text but only if they use their handgun as a stylus.

8. Washington state will legalize marijuana. Wait, didn’t they already do that? Oh man…

9. J.K. Rowling will release a surprise book “Harry Potter Magically Pays Off His Student Loans.”

10. An asteroid will collide with earth but not before explaining it got the Mayan calendar wrong.

Copyright 2012 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Jul. 24, 2012 SVForum PWC Mobile

On July 24, 2012, in Palo Alto at Pillsbury Winthrop, SVForum with PWC presented a Quarterly Venture Breakfast on Mobile. Stanley Pierson of Pillsbury Winthrop moderated panelists Steve Bengston of PwC, Bob Borchers of Opus Capital, Kim Morgan of Motorola Mobility and Venu Pemmaraju of Intel Capital. By definition the mobile market is in constant motion. Five years ago Europe’s infrastructure and Nokia led the way. Today, Apple’s iPhone and Google’s Android dominate the discussions. Five years ago most Facebook users were on PCs, now most are mobile as trend accelerates.

There are still challenges. Batteries face physical restraints that are addressed with software managing power. There is a debate about how much personal information should be on the device versus in the cloud. Content providers have to deal with smaller screens to accommodate advertising. Company brand managers now understand that an app can be the ad to target customers. Of course, making a purchase may not be easy. The promise of Near Field Communication (NFC) has bogged down in dealing with banks, carriers, device manufactures and merchants. The solution may already exist. Apple started iTunes selling music and then expanded to movies, television, movies, books and magazines. Amazon started selling books, but now you can buy appliances through them. How far away are we from buying a cup of coffee through iTunes or Amazon? Monetizing mobility is a moving target.

Copyright 2012 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Jul. 17, 2012 Global Career Fair Tech Symposium

On July 17, 2012 at the Santa Clara Convention Center, the fourth annual Global Career Fair with Tech Symposium hosted panel discussions on cloud computing, big data, mobile and security issues. Some of the speakers attending: Stefan Andreasen of Kapow, Anjul Bhambhri of IBM, Jake Flomenberg of Accel, Brian Johnson of eBay, KRS Murthy of I Cubed, Sumeet Singh of Yahoo, Bala Venkatrao of Cloudera and Bob Wiedenhold of Couchbase. Companies looking for talent were Apple, Arista, Barnes and Noble, BMSOFT Systems, Citrix, Couchbase, HCL, HP, Infosys, Pocket Gems and Tata.

Copyright 2012 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Jun. 25, 2012 The New Yorker

On Jun. 25, 2012 The New Yorker’s Ken Auletta wrote “Paper Trail” about the battle of Amazon, Apple and publishers over control of the electronic publishing market. It signals the shift from the wholesale model publishers of selling books at a discount to bookstores to the agency model where the channel like Apple gets a thirty percent commission. In the battle over becoming the online gatekeeper controlling consumers, books seem irrelevant.

Jill Lepore wrote “Obama, The Prequel” about Obama’s family history. He said “I am the son of a black man from Kenya and a white woman from Kansas. I have brothers, sisters, nieces, nephews, uncles and cousins, of every race and hue, scattered across three continents, and for as long as I live, I will never forget that in no other country on Earth is my story even possible.” In the worst of all possible worlds the impossible man wins.

Copyright 2012 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Mar. 7, 2012 Apple New iPad

On March 7, 2012 in San Francisco at Yerba Buena Center, Apple’s CEO Tim Cook announced its third new iPad for $499. It has a sharper 2048 x 1536 retina display, faster A5X quad-core graphics and an six hour battery life. To me, the most interesting feature was the five megapixel iSight camera. It supposedly has a infrared filters, autofocus, white balance and face detection. The second more interesting feature was the ability to do voice dictation. It is a device I might actually buy to make my life easier.

Copyright 2012 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Nov. 21, 2011 The New Yorker

Nov. 21, 2011 The New Yorker’s James Surowiecki wrote “Debt By Degrees” about student college loan debt that is so high, that young people will not be able to go into further debt by buying cars or houses, getting married or having children. “Two million college graduates are unemployed and millions more are underemployed.” We need to change the way we educate people and the way we pay for it.

Jane Kramer wrote “The Food At Our Feet” about Denmark’s Rene Redzepi. He is reviving foraging for food by identifying the best foods for his restaurant customers.

Thomas Mallon wrote “Never Happened.” about the counterfactual or alternative histories of Monica Ali, Michael Chabon, Nicholas DiChario, Philip K. Dick, Don DeLillo, Harlan Ellison, Niall Ferguson, Elizabeth Gaffney, William Gibson, Jeff Greenfield, Robert Harris, Samantha Hunt, Stephen King, Thomas Pynchon, Philip Roth, J.C. Squire, Bruce Sterling, and Harry Turtledove.

Malcolm Gladwell wrote “The Tweaker” about what made Apple CEO Steve Jobs so successful.

Jill Lepore wrote “Birthright” about the history and future of Planned Parenthood.

Copyright 2011 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Nov. 16, 2011 WCA What’s Hot

On Wednesday November 16, 2011 in Santa Clara at Silicon Valley Bank hosted the WCA12th Annual VC Panel “What’s Hot (and What’s Not) in Mobility.” Carrie Walsh of Silicon Valley Bank moderated panelists Juha Christensen of Progression Partners, Steve Goldberg of Venrock, Tae Hea Nahm of Storm Ventures, Rama Sekhar of Norwest Venture Partners and Eric Zimits of Granite Ventures. They discussed the current and possible future of mobile technology.

While Apple makes most of the profits, Android is selling more phones. The diversity of devices from phones to televisions is forcing developers to prepare content for whatever “end screen” it winds up on. Much of that content will be social games running over an LTE or 4G network. Beyond games, users will navigate down the street with voice directions from services like Apple’s Siri. Once at a store, they will be guided with Location Based Systems (LBS) and scan Quick Response (QR) codes on items and compare them with online prices. If the price is right, they will buy it with Near Field Communication (NFC) technology, avoiding bank debit card fees.

While reusing available spectrum in developed countries is a major problem, getting the rest of the world online is the bigger opportunity. Most will use prepaid services and have trouble charging their devices. Solve these problems and build market growth where none existed before.

Copyright 2011 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Nov. 2, 2011 ASAP Gang Of Four War

On November 2, 2011 in San Jose at Cisco, the ASAP Silicon Valley held “Changing the Game: The Age of the Platform and the 24-Hour Customer.” ASAP leaders Nimma Bakshi of PWC and John Soper of New Paradigms moderated Sherrick Murdoff of Salesforce, Adrian Ott of Exponential Edge Consulting and Phil Simon of Phil Simon Systems.

In reaction to a Fast Company magazine article, Adrian Ott, author of “The 24-Hour Customer” and Phil Simon author of “The Age of the Platform” talked with Sherrick Murdoff about the coming “Gang Of Four” war for consumer attention from social media giants like Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google.

Copyright 2011 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

 

 

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Sep. 27, 2011 WCA Mobile Cloud Thin Vs. Smart

On Tuesday September 27, 2011 in Mountain View at Fenwick & West, LLP, the WCA Mobile SIG presented “Mobile Cloud – Thin vs. Smart Device & Services Differentiation.” Dr. Avril Salter of Next Direction Technologies moderated panelists Karun Bakshi of Microsoft BizSpark One, Priya Abani of Intel, Hugh Fletcher of Verizon Wireless, Samir Kumar of Samsung Telecommunications America, Laura Merling of Alcatel-Lucent and Jamie Perlman of Box.net.

Amazon, Apple and Google are developing their own clouds for mobile users. Obviously they think a thin browser on a fast network could deliver a wide range of services and apps. The problem is that even 5G networks may not be able to handle demand. One solution is to make smart phones even smarter about using existing spectrum and the cloud. Rather than divergence there may be a compromise to accommodate both thin and smart device strategies.

Copyright 2011 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

May 10, 2011 WCA Mobile App Development

On May 10, 2011 in San Jose  at Rhomobile, the WCA Mobile SIG presented “Whither Mobile App Development?” Sarah Allen of Blazing Cloud moderated panelists Adam Blum of Rhomobile, Andre Charland of Nitobi, Jeff Haynie of Appcelerator and Isaac Mosquera of AppMakr. They discussed developing apps for more than one mobile platform using tools like Rhodes, Titanium, PhoneGap, and other web-based cross-platform development frameworks. This write-once strategy makes sense if you remember the dominant mobile platforms five years ago were Palm, Microsoft and Symbian compared to Android and Apple today.

Also on attending were Roberto Araujo of LMGPR, WiFi expert Avril Salter, STC Silicon Valley Media Advisor David Strom and Gabriele Gresta of BrainSpark.

Copyright 2011 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

 

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Feb. 1, 2011 SDF PWC

On Tuesday, February 1, 2011 in Palo Alto at Pillsbury Winthrop, SDForum presented a Quarterly Venture Breakfast with Pillsbury Winthrop and PricewaterhouseCoopers. Allison Leopold-Tilley of Pillsbury Winthrop moderated panelists Steve Bengston of PricewaterhouseCoopers, Tim Chang of Norwest Venture Partners, Mark Gorenberg of Hummer Winblad Venture Partners, Todd MacLean of Accel Partners and Jon Sakoda of NEA.

Where 2009 was a tough year, 2010 was a mixed year. Venture capitalists invested ten billion dollars more than they raised. Something has got to give and it will probably be the weaker VCs. Most of it went to cleantech, biotech, and medical devices facing infrastructure and regulatory obstacles. Meanwhile the mobile space grew with the demand for smart phones and the services they use.

With the economy down for so long, there is a thirst for growth. Companies with lots of cash are looking for new opportunities. The problem is the symbiotic relationship between M&A and IPOs does not work well in environment with Sarbanes Oxley and investors burned by too many bubbles. Few startups want to have an IPO and therefore have less leverage in negotiating M&As. Not every startup is like Facebook where they can attract large amounts of investment from Goldman Sachs and Russian private equity.

Which brings up the issue of foreign investment and growth. China has bigger market, more companies, more growth and more deals than the United States. While many Chinese startups come to America for the prestige of getting money from Silicon Valley VCs, eventually they may get more money staying home. The question is how to exit in a market that may be less transparent or stable.

The lack of foreign capital could mean a return to normal. At this point the number of jobs and the amount of investment in Silicon Valley are about where they were in the 1990s, before everything was caught up in the dotcom bubble. Most of the VC money in the country is still spent here. As VCs chase bigger deals, super angels are stepping in. While investors create wealth with M&As, they do not create jobs. Large companies are buying startups not just for their intellectual property but their talented employees. This process only consolidates the number of jobs. In order to increase the number of jobs, we need to increase the number of IPOs.

The next year will see the further rise of Apple, Facebook and Google platforms in the mobile space. Moving operations to the cloud will be normal. BRIC countries will continue to grow while other countries try to emulate them. After years of decline, there is a chance for growth.

Copyright 2011 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Dec. 2, 2010 SDF Mobile Holiday Event

December 2, 2010 in Palo Alto at Nokia, the SDForum Mobile SIG held a Sponsor Appreciation & Holiday Event. Sponsors presenting their 2011 initiatives were Microsoft, Nokia, Orange and SAP. Bruno  Terkaly of Microsoft gave an overview of Windows Phone 7 overview for consumers. Tony Kueh of SAP’s Sybase talked about payments, carrier provisioning, SMS and MMS transactions. Satya  Mallya of Orange talked about apps, systems integration and and running multiple operating systems. Samir Agarwal of MeeGo explained how MeeGo is true open source and a handset will be available in the first quarter of 2011.

Joe Jasin took an audience survey of 47 people about which of the many OS’s which were the top 3 for the audience to develop on presently. I did not believe the the results, but maybe it was just the crowd:

Android 25
Symbian 3
Brew 0
Microsoft 6
MeeGo 6
BREW 0
Apple 8
Palm 3
RIM 0

Jasin also asked “If Facebook were to have an OS ready tomorrow would you develop on it?” The answer was a unanimous NO! He was surprised, and said, “Wow, now lets get the age demographic in the room.”

I would like to thank Joe Jasin for his contribution to this article.

Copyright 2010 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Sept. 23, 2010 SDF Women Thrive At Apple

On September 23, 2010 in Cupertino at Apple, the SDForum Tech Women’s Event presented “Don’t Survive “ Thrive: How to be your best when just getting by seems almost impossible. Bobbie LaPorte of RAL & Associates with role models Barbara Massa of McAfee and Leslie Bull of HarvestMark spoke about keeping a positive attitude and making the most of their skills in a tough environment.

Copyright 2010 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Jun. 23, 2010 AmBAR Medvedev Silicon Valley

On June 23, 2010 Russian President Dmitry Medvedev visited Silicon Valley companies Apple and Cisco to learn how to set up a research and development center outside of Moscow in Skolkovo. Medvedev also spoke to AmBAR members at Stanford University’s Dinkelspiel Auditorium. While he used the latest iPad and Twitter in his speech, no photos were allowed to be taken at the event, sending mixed messages about openness and transparency. Obviously a lot of work needs to be done.

Copyright 2010 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Apr. 20, 2010 WCA Mobile OS War

On April 20, 2010 in Santa Clara at Qualcomm, the WCA Mobile SIG presented “Mobile OS? 2010 and Beyond”. Lars Kamp of Accenture Growth Strategy Practice moderated panelists David Cao of ExtendLogic, Todd Crick of inCode Telecom, Asokan Thiyagarajan of Samsung Telecommunications America, Oliver Gunasekara of the Symbian Foundation and Hugh Fletcher of Verizon Wireless. They discussed who would be the winners and losers in the battle of mobile operating systems. There will be battles between open and closed systems, consumer and enterprise as well as mobile devices beyond phones.

By 2013, smart phones will be over thirty percent of the market and have the same amount of processing power of your laptop today. The question is who will dominate? Right now it looks like Apple, Android and Symbian. Apple seems to have commanding lead with over 150,000 applications for the iPhone and now iPad. The number of devices sold increases every quarter. Google’s Android continues to attract manufacturers, developers and carriers. The risk is that the Android OS may fragment as each party tries to optimize for its own advantage. Symbian OS 4 is about to be refreshed and is based on open architecture. There are Symbian phones batteries that can last over three weeks without recharging. Pretty amazing. Microsoft’s Windows Mobile 6.5 OS is aiming for a consistent interface with computer and game consoles. RIM’s Blackberry OS 4.6 has a loyal following. Palm’s webOS is in trouble.

The winner will give users the best experience at the lowest cost on the fastest network. Do that and you win the war.

Copyright 2010 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Mar. 4, 2010 SDF Wedbush and MoSoNex

SDF logo2009 copySingh Gurminder copySutherland Scott copy

On Thursday March 4, 2010 in Palo Alto at Nokia, the SDForum Mobile SIG hosted “Digital Media End-User Demographics and Generations” to discuss mobile consumption and distribution in the current mobile markets. The convergence of digital media in telecommunications and the Internet is spreading to all age groups and across international boundaries. Text from DJCline.com

Scott Sutherland, Managing Director of Technology Investments at Wedbush gave one of the best snapshots of the mobile industry so far. There are seven billion people on the planet, five billion have cell phones and one billion have Internet access. Mobile devices are now the dominant computing platform on the planet displacing desktop or laptop computers. The mobile market is fragmented by carriers, manufacturers and regulation. Companies that control hardware, software, content and the distribution network will eventually marginalize this crowded field. Text from DJCline.com

Who will dominate? Carriers jealously control access to get their percentage of texting and video. Hardware and software players push for proprietary standards. Content developers try to guard their content with DRM. Each of these controls only a part of the mobile market. Apple controls every aspect of the customer experience except the network it must get from carriers like AT&T. Google controls software with Android and arguably access to content, but does not control the hardware or network. The growth of WiFi could bypass the carriers entirely. The winners will be those who can dramatically simplify the situation for users. Text from DJCline.com

Gurminder Singh, Ph.D. CTO and COO of MoSoNex has devised such a solution. He wanted to send family pictures from America to his mother in India. He sent them to a relative’s cell phone living in the same house as his mother. While it took seconds to send the pictures half way around the world it took a month to transfer the pictures from a cell phone to a TV. Text from DJCline.com

MoSoNex has figured out how to simplify this process. You set up a friends and family network with all the players identified for easy access. You can then take a picture with your cell phone and send it to your grandmother. She can watch it on her iPTV or any other device like another cell phone. He also understands the broader implications of sending this beyond family and friends. I think you could make the group as large as you want and become a one man CNN by charging subscribers or selling ads. Text from DJCline.com

03-04-10 Nokiabldg copy03-04-10 crowdpan1 copyIMG_6204 copyIMG_6205 copyIMG_6208 copyIMG_6212 copyIMG_6213 copyIMG_6225 copywooddonut copy

Copyright 2010 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Oct. 20, 2009 SDF PWC

SDF logo2009 copyBerry Savinay copyBurks Sylvia 3 copyLussier Jim copyNam Ho copyShah Prashant copyWallace Danny copy

On October 20, 2009 at Pillsbury Winthrop in Palo Alto, SDForum held the Quarterly Venture Breakfast Series in collaboration with PWC. Sylvia Burks of Pillsbury Winthrop moderated panelists Savinay Berry of Granite Ventures, Jim Lussier of Norwest Venture Partners, Ho Nam of Altos Ventures, Prashant Shah of Hummer Winblad and Danny Wallace of PricewaterhouseCoopers.

Danny Wallace of PricewaterhouseCoopers kicked off the meeting with an analysis of where investments went over the past year in biotechnology, industrial energy, software, medical devices and media/entertainment. Basically the level of investment is where it was back in 1996. The consensus is that the economy has hit bottom and may be recovering slowly.

Enterprise software burst with dotcom bubble mainly because so few packages were actually implemented. The need for enterprise services is still there and may be met with software as a service (SAAS), cloud computing or just plain web services. Larry Ellison of Oracle appeared in video clip disparaging anything called “cloud”. Even the panelists were skeptical. Your elevator pitch must explain what it does for an enterprise not just that it takes place in the cloud. Large companies will still try to run in-house clouds but smaller companies can quickly benefit from pushing their IT functions into the cloud. IT managers will manage platforms and data rather than hardware. Over time the costs and benefits will be obvious and most companies will outsource their IT the way they outsource their electricity. Develop a product or service that is sticky for users and does not require begging for scarce resoures from an inside IT department. Offering reliable security is solid selling point.

As Apple’s continued success shows, a good idea or service can triumph in bad times. A good idea can grow a company or create a new industry. They did not wait for a recovery. They started their own.

10-20-09 ellison copy10-20-09 panel1 copy10-20-09 panel2 copy10-20-09 crowd1 copy10-20-09 slide1 copy10-20-09 slide2 copy10-20-09 slide3 copy

Copyright 2009 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Sept. 24, 2009 SDF Social Media

SDF logo2009 copyFouts Janet copyGogna Sheena copyLichtenberg Ravit copyMiller Jo copy

On September 24, 2009 in Cupertino at Apple the SDForum Tech Womens Program & Marketing SIG presented “Professional Development 2.0: Taming Social Media”. Jo Miller of Women’s Leadership Coaching moderated panelists Janet Fouts Partner of Tatu Digital Media, Sheena Gogna of LinkedIn and Ravit Lichtenberg of Ustrategy. The panel discussed how to use social media to develop your personal brand, expand your professional network, manage your career and improve productivity.

09-24-09 panel copy

Copyright 2009 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

Aug. 6, 2009 SDF doubleTwist

SDF logo2009 copyFarantzos Monique copyJasin Joe copyJohansen JonLech copyLam Peter copyWeber Goetz copy

On August 6, 2009 in Menlo Park at the Orrick campus, SDForum’s Mobile SIG hosted the leaders of doubleTwist, CEO Monique Farantzos, CTO Jon Lech Johansen and COO Goetz Weber.

Their presentation focused on distribution of digital media and the concepts of open vs. closed ecosystems. What is going on between Apple and doubleTwist? What are the trends in moving content across platforms? Can content move easily between Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and your TV, laptop and cell phone? The platform doubleTwist presents is an open framework for new kinds of messaging.

They have had some success in Japan. Customers use their software to download content onto their cell phones and share it with family and friends. The software can be bundled with SD chips or other media and loaded onto almost any mobile device.

They are up to something. Stay tuned or even iTuned.

08-06-09 DTslide19 copy08-06-09 DTslide20 copy08-06-09 DTslide21 copy08-06-09 DTslide22 copy

Copyright 2009 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS

May 13, 2008 SDF Teen Tech 2

SDForum copy.jpgagrawal-athias-copy.jpgalexander-deanna-copy.jpgbajarin-ben-copy.jpgbolwell-andrew-copy.jpgbraccia-andrew-copy.jpgbrackeen-debra-copy.jpgbrusilovsky-daniel-copy.jpgchoudhary-anirudh-copy.jpgdeglin-george-copy.jpgdonohue-stacy-copy.jpgescobedo-richard-copy.jpgfranusic-joel-copy.jpggibbs-mike-copy.jpggibbs-peggy-copy.jpgha-oanh-copy.jpghathi-sekal-copy.jpghoffman-steve-copy.jpgirwin-jeff-copy.jpgjoh-jae-copy.jpgkamrin-ameer-copy.jpgkapur-ravi-copy.jpgkarras-jeff-copy.jpgkazerooni-mazy-copy.jpgkobylarz-constance-copy.jpgkumar-shooby-copy.jpgleopoldtilley-allison-copy.jpglevide-cliff-copy.jpglevine-drew-copy.jpglevy-mitchell-copy.jpglewin-jd-copy.jpglibova-alina-copy.jpgliddle-daniel-copy.jpglindsay-jeff-copy.jpglodha-surahbi-copy.jpgmagid-larry-copy.jpgmonsalve-sergio-copy.jpgnoguchi-sharon-copy.jpgoishi-lindsay-copy.jpgolson-stephanie-copy.jpgosborn-jon-copy.jpgpande-mani-copy.jpgpelton-charles-copy.jpgpetersson-viktor-copy.jpgpriyanka-bhatia-copy.jpgrodhe-karen-copy.jpgsakai-john-copy.jpgsamar-anshul-copy.jpgsamar-vipin-copy.jpgshalavi-alex-copy.jpgsiebert-jeff-copy.jpgsmith-adam-copy.jpgsmith-whitney-copy.jpgstock-elizabeth-copy.jpgstrange-angela-copy.jpgthompson-matt-copy.jpgtruong-salina-copy.jpgvan-diggelen-alison-copy.jpgwilde-jonathan-copy.jpgwu-elaine-copy.jpg

On May 13, 2008 at HP in Palo Alto, SDForum held it’s second annual Teen Tech event. NPR, the San Jose Mercury News and CBS 60 Minutes covered this year’s bigger event.

One way to see the future is to meet the people who will be living in it. The Teen Tech event is a good way to see what the next fifty years will be like. Teens connect with each other while moving through physical and virtual space using voice, video, text messaging and games. Teens are moving beyond social networking to building businesses with each other. The question is not what technology teens will buy but what technology they will sell to the rest of us.

SDForum’s CEO Susan Lucas-Conwell and HP’s Debra Brackeen kicked off the event by introducing Anshul Samar of Alchemist Empire. Samar created a game where chemical elements and compounds become essentially action figures with particular properties. It has sold thousands of copies around the world.

Stephanie Olsen of Cnet moderated the High School panel with Deanna Alexander, Priyanka Bhatia, Sekal Hathi and Jonathan Wilde. Teens seldom watch TV but do watch YouTube. It would be nice to see a new episode on a big TV. They listen to music from iTunes and movies on Netflix and search for reviews on Google. They spend six hours a day on the laptops doing homework, reading and e-mailing because it can reach teachers, relatives or potential employers outside their age group. Students want teachers to create consistent user interfaces with lectures online and interactive whiteboards for online classes.

While they have no trouble learning new technical skills they still want to work on their real world social skills. Facebook is more popular and less complicated than MySpace. Most smart phones are not as smart as the iPhone. They want GPS, decent video and calendars interfaces that are easier to use. Like their parents, they are very concerned about privacy and safety. They are more likely to participate in causes online than their parents.

Allison Leopold Tilley of Pillsbury Winthrop moderated the second panel with Steve Hoffman of ROCKETON, JD Lewin of Microsoft, Matt Thompson of Sun, and Ameer Karim of HP. Millennials are so adept at new technology that their parents ask them for technical advice. They see teens more mobile, more virtual and more likely to use or develop open source applications. They are also more fickle and likely to drop a brand or technology if something better comes along. They have to see value before buying.

Online games are attracting millions of players usually by personal recommendations. Games designed by teens will be played by teens. They want to be able to create and control their online identities across platforms. They want to have their Grand Theft Auto avatar on their Facebook account.

Karen Rohde of SUN talked with Mani Pande of Institute for the Future about teens in the workforce. To attract talent companies will need to use blogs, wikis, instant messaging and texting. Teens multitask and will text message each other while in a meeting. They are more likely to communicate and collaborate. If they don’t know something they will search and find someone who does. They expect flexible schedules and are seeking mentors to plan their careers.

Salina Truong of Gumball Capital spoke about her early desire to do good. As a child she wanted to buy a third world country. As a teen she sold Rubik’s Cubes and snacks and moved on to selling affiliate software on eBay. Now she works with Kiva.org to encourage micro lending around the world.

Larry Magid of CBS moderated the College panel with George Deglin of Berkeley, Jae Joh of Stanford, Mazy Kazerooni of Ustream, Alina Libova of Cal Poly, Jon Osborn of Santa Clara and Jeff Siebert of Stanford. They don’t watch TV or read newspapers. College students still use e-mail and carry laptops. About half the laptops at Stanford are Apple. Upper class students want smart phones that can surf the web like the iPhone or Blackberry. Other kids use basic cell phones and Microsoft Windows. Both groups look for music groups with MySpace. They use Facebook, Salesforce and Google Groups to keep track of friends or contacts. Teens will content as long as there are no strings attached like DRM. They want cell phones that vibrate and text message on faster networks. They like iTunes, Crunchgear, TechCrunch and Woot.com. They want better aggregation and interoperability in software applications. All of this technology makes it easier for them to be more socially and politically active.

Ben Bajrin of Creative Strategies moderated the Investor panel with Andrew Braccia of Accel, Sergio Monsalve of Norwest Venture Partners and Angela Strange of Bay Partners. Despite the current downturn investors and teens know the economy is cyclical and it will turn around. Bad investors and investments stay out of a down market and it is easier to see through the clutter. High energy costs will force the next generation to redesign where they live, work and play. Their technology choices will percolate through society and show up in other age groups. The opportunities are in mobile, content and branding. Right now there is no way for a teen to buy online without a credit card. That is an opportunity, and not just for teens. Fee or subscription models are vulnerable to advertising driven free content models. While they look for opportunities to invest in teen entrepreneurs they still want them to continue their educations.

Richard Escobedo of Teens in Tech spoke about his interest in entrepreneurship from age of seven until his present age of fourteen. He learned to be resourceful, seek help when necessary and to persevere. He started a podcast for teens and uses Twitter, WordPress, Apple and Final Cut Express video. Beyond technology he plays football and the violin.

Courtney Macavinta of Respectrx moderated the Teen Entrepreneurs with Drew Levine, Shooby Kumar and Daniel Brusilovsky. One factor in becoming a young entrepreneur is growing up in a family that values technology and entrepreneurship. They see lower barriers of entry in starting a business, with a great demand for video content.

Non-profits are inspiring teens too. Whitney Smith talked about the Girls for a Change that uses technology to build networks for girls in poor neighborhoods. Elizabeth Stock of Computers for Youth spoke of making learning fun and relevant in ways outside traditional education. Joel Franusic and Adam Smith of SuperHappyDevHouse invited teens to their big open source event at Sun Microsystems Menlo Park campus the next weekend.

Note: Forest Grove OR 8-29-17

Copyright 2008 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Share
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Twitter
  • email
  • Fark
  • LinkedIn
  • RSS