Tag Archives: Andrew Marantz

Oct. 31, 2016 The New Yorker

Oct. 31, 2016 The New Yorker’s Andrew Marantz wrote “Trolls For Trump” about conservative extremist online supporters attacking anyone they do not like  with fake news. Meme expert Richard Dawkins said “Now, however ridiculous what you are saying is, if you make it mimetically successful, something really bad can spread through culture.”

George Packer wrote “The Unconnected” about how Democratic leadership is disconnected from poor voters who may not vote in the numbers they used to. They feel neglected. They may vote for people that do not represent their own best interest. “The fact that so many informed, sophisticated Americans failed to see Donald Trump coming, and the kept writing him off, is itself a sign of a democracy in which no center holds.” “Trump represents  the whole country’s failure.”

Copyright 2016 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Apr. 25, 2016 The New Yorker

On Apr. 25, 2016 The New Yorker’s Jelani Cobb wrote “Working Class Heroes” about conservative attitudes toward poor communities. Conservative commentator Kevin Williamson said “The truth about these dysfunctional downscale communities is that they deserve to die.” I am surprised he did not ask if there were any prisons.

James Surowiecki wrote “Unlikely Alliances” about big corporations supporting LGBT issues. Civil rights are good for business.

Andrew Marantz wrote “Studio 360” about the latest in virtual reality.

Copyright 2016 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Jan. 4, 2016 The New Yorker

On Jan. 4, 2016 The New Yorker’s Andrew Marantz wrote “Ready For Prime Time” about Saturday Night Live’s Leslie Jones.

Dexter Filkins wrote “Swamped” about Jeb Bush’s disastrous environmental policies as Governor of Florida.

Larissa MacFarquhar wrote “What Money Can Buy” about Ford Foundation president Darren Walker’s new efforts to fight inequality around the world.

Laura Secor wrote “War Of Words” about Asieh Amini an exiled activist trying to end the stoning deaths of women in Iran.

Copyright 2016 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Jan. 5, 2015 The New Yorker

Jan. 5, 2015 The New Yorker’s Andrew Marantz wrote “The Virologist” about MuggleNet founder Emerson Spartz, who figured out how memes went viral to create targeted advertising. He said “The lines between advertising and content are blurring.”

Louis Menand wrote “Pulp’s Big Moment” about the rise and fall of cheap paperbacks in the 1940s and 1950s. Before the 1930s, most books were sold (not surprisingly) in bookstores. Paperbacks were sold at newsstands, drugstores and train stations next to magazines. It as an explosion of content that was high and low brow entertainment. Free broadcast television disrupted the paperback business model the same way the internet disrupted television. Ironically you can download old paperbacks onto your phone.

Copyright 2015 DJ Cline All rights reserved.

Sep. 16, 2013 The New Yorker

On Sep. 16, 2013 The New Yorker‘s James Surowiecki wrote “Uber Alles”about the hype surrounding the sharing economy. Millennials are so mired in student debt they will never be able to have a middle class lifestyle of owning cars or houses. The response has been Uber and Airbnb, where companies supply a service and you get no money or benefits in your struggle to stay alive. This is not sustainable. Real jobs and real pay lead to real growth.

Andrew Marantz wrote “Unreality Star” about people who think they are in their own “Truman Show”. Maybe they are being watched right now. :-)

Copyright 2013 DJ Cline All rights reserved.